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Black Agenda Radio – 04.01.19

Welcome to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. I’m Glen Ford, along with my co-host Nellie Bailey. Coming up: The whole basis for the millions of words  and two maddening years of Russiagate has collapsed, but the near-state of war between the two nuclear superpowers continues; We’ll speak with a reearcher who studies African women at war; and, a Haitian activist explains why the people want their U.S.-backed government to step down.

Anti-war forces have converged on the nation’s capital to denounce the aggressive policies of NATO, the North Atlantic Treaty organization that links the militaries of the United States and Europe. Official Washington is staging an elaborate 70th birthday party for NATO on April 4th. That’s also the anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, who more than half a century ago indicted the United States as the greatest purveyor of violence in the world. We spoke with Ajamu Baraka, the lead organizer of the Black Alliance for Peace. Baraka says the NATO birthday party is a celebration of state violence.

David Swanson is an activist with World Beyond War, and publisher of the influential web site “War Is A Crime.” Swanson says Russiagate has dramatically increased tensions between the two nuclear super-powers.

Haiti has been occupied by foreign militaries ever since the United States overthrew its elected government in 2004, and was the victim of several U.S. military invasions and occupations in the 20th century. Haitians have been taking to the streets by the hundreds of thousands, demanding that their U.S.-backed government step down. Daoud Andre is a Brooklyn-based radio host and an activist with the Committee to Organize Against Dictatorship. We spoke with him, last week.

Mumia Abu Jamal, the nation’s best known political prisoner, is also an acclaimed author who has written extensively on the violence inherent in the U.S. State. U.S. warmakers have long had their eyes on Venezuela.

Selinka Makana is a scholar at the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality at Columbia University. Makana was born in Kenya, and specializes in studying African women at war. She’s author of a recent article titled “Contested Encounters: Towards a 21st Century African Feminist Ethnography.” Dr. Makana says the social science of ethnography must be de-colonized.

 

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