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Progressive Commentary Hour – 09.01.15

September 1, 2015

Guest #1 - Prof. James Brewer Stewart is a Professor Emeritus of History at Macalester College in Minneapolis, where he taught subjects on race, politics, social movements and labor systems. He has written dozen books and is highly regarded as a national expert on the American abolitionist movement. In 2011 he founded the nonprofit organization Historians Against Slavery, which brings together scholars to investigate the historical context behind modern day slavery in order to better inform social activism and civil efforts to eradicate the new forms of servant indenture that is increasing in the US. The organization hosts annual conferences for the public that feature experts in the field of modern day slavery. His website is HistoriansAgainstSlavery.org Guest #2 - Steven Watt is the Senior Staff Attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union’s Human Rights Program specializing in civil and human rights litigation, which includes US rendition, detention, interrogation programs, human trafficking and forced labor, juvenile justice and women’s immigrants and juvenile justice. Earlier, while working with the Center for Constitutional Rights as a Human Rights Fellow. Among the cases he has worked on are Rasul vs Geroge Bush, and two cases against Attorney General John Ashcroft. Steven has also done substantial work overseas as a public defender for the government of the Solomon Islands, managing refugee camps in Tanzania, and directing emergency programs for displaced persons in Liberia. Originally from Scotland, Steve has a law degree from the University of Aberdeen, a degree in legal practice from the University of Edinburgh, and an LLM in International Human Rights from the University of Notre Dame. His website is his homepage at ACLU.org/Bio/Steven-M-Watt.

Nature Bats Last – 09.01.15

September 1, 2015

This show we have a climate update, our Doomer of the Week and our guest Stephen Jenkinson. Jenkinson is a teacher, author, storyteller, spiritual activist, farmer and founder of the Orphan Wisdom School, a teaching house and learning house for the skills of deep living and making human culture. It is rooted in knowing history, being claimed by ancestry, working for a time ​yet to come.​ He is the author of a Die Wise, A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul.

Project Censored – 09.01.15

September 1, 2015

Peter Phillips and Mickey Huff co-hosts for the Project Censored show provide an update on human rights abuses in Mexico funded by US; they speak with researcher/journalist Laura Carlsen in Mexico City. The remainder of the program focuses on the impacts of nuclear technology on the enviroment and society. Ken Buesseler and Tim Mousseau summarize their scientific research about the ongoing consequences of the Fukushima disaster, for Japan and for the Pacific. The program concludes with a rebroadcast of a Project Censored interview with investigative journalist and nuclear-energy critic Karl Grossman.

Project Censored – 08.25.15

September 1, 2015

In a remarkable case study of censorship, author and political cartoonist Ted Rall recounts how he was dropped from the Los Angeles Times, purportedly for giving an untrue account of a 2001 encounter with an LAPD officer, who cited Rall for jaywalking. As he refutes the 'evidence' behind his dismissal, Rall also points out links between the Times, the LAPD, and the police union, raising questions about how decisions are made at one of the "big three" U.S. newspapers.

Project Censored – 08.18.15

September 1, 2015

This week's program offers two perspectives on global capitalism and permanent war. Sociologist William Robinson makes the case that the present state of capitalism may be a "systemic crisis," something not seen in centuries. Then peace advocate Kathy Kelly relates her experiences from Afghanistan to US prisons, and refutes the notion of"humanitarian war." William Robinson teaches Sociology at UC Santa Barbara. Kathy Kelly is the founder of Voices for Creative Nonviolence.

Project Censored – 08.11.15

September 1, 2015

On the Project Censored show Peter Phillips with California Green Party activist Laura Wells as co-host interview professor Peter Mathews regarding his book “Dollar Democracy: with Liberty and Justice for Some,” regarding key issues including the decline of the middle class, inequality in education, health care, the collapse of the environment, and what needs to be done. The conversation addresses issues from GMO labeling to California's Proposition 13 to the runaway Pentagon budget; Matthews' underlying theme is that most contemporary political problems can be traced to the super-rich controlling the electoral process through campaign contributions.

Let’s Create A Better World – 08.29.15

September 1, 2015

Our guest Dr. Peggy Martin, Holistic Doctor, Scientist and researcher, spoke with co-host Stefan Rudolph on Hydration, alkaline water and the benefits of its use and Healthy aging.

Let’s Create A Better World – 08.22.15

September 1, 2015

Joseph Ross, master astrologer and business consultant spoke about the astrological activities currently taking place, understanding and dealing with relationships in our lives and the need for the people to work together as a community and grow as a whole. Second guest Michael Woods from New York City spoke on cell phone radiation and the damaging effects it is and has had on us individually and as a society. He spoke on protecting yourself from the negative effects of cell phone and other wireless devices and also discussed some great activities coming up in October re: a health show that attending.

Infectious Myth – Adam Lankford on Guns – 09.01.15

September 1, 2015

In Episode 69 David interviews professor Adam Lankford who recently published research, at an American Sociological Society conference, showing that the strongest factor that he studied that correlates with the number of mass shootings in a country is the rate of civilian gun ownership. David and Adam talk about whether mass shootings are important, as they represent only a small fraction of total gun deaths, and what some of the characteristics of gun shooters are, compared to other murderers, and how they differ between the US and other countries. Some of the surprising statistics is that mass shooters are almost all male, whereas a small but significant fraction of other gun murders are by women. Mass shooters in the US on average kill fewer people, perhaps because of faster and more effective police response. Mass shooters outside the US are more likely to target military facilities, whereas American mass shooters are more likely to target civilian areas, such as schools, shopping malls and movie theaters. Mass shooters do tend to be loners, and they often focus their feelings of despair on a specific group, but this targeting does not appear to be the main reason for their violence. Professor Adam Lankford’s website is: http://adamlankford.com

Leid Stories – 09.01.15

September 1, 2015

Labor Pains for 137,000: The Auto Workers Union and Detroit’s Big 3 It’s six weeks since the United Auto Workers union began hardball negotiations with Detroit’s Big Three—General Motors Co., Ford Motor Co. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles US—over a slew of issues related to a new contract for some 137,000 workers. The current contract expires Sept. 14, and with no agreement yet struck on the top grievance—a two-tiered wage system that pays workers hired after 2007 about half what senior workers warn—union members have voted to authorize a strike against all three manufacturers in the event of “bad-faith” negotiations. Frank Hammer, a retired 32-year GM worker and former chairman and president of the UAW’s 3,500-member Local 909 in Warren, Mich., for 12 years, takes us behind the scenes of the current negotiations, but with a blistering critique of the UAW. The union’s leadership has been capitulating to the dictates of the auto industry for more than a decade, Hammer contends.
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