Black Agenda Radio

With Glen Ford & Nellie Bailey
Black Agenda Radio – BAR is a weekly hour of African American political thought and action. BAR is the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a black left perspective.

Black Agenda Radio – 01.04.16

January 4, 2016

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – Activists from around the country will gather at Temple University, in Philadelphia, on January 8th, for a conference on the Black Radical Tradition. Dr. Cornel West, the nation’s best-known Black public intellectual, is one of the keynote speakers. We asked Dr. West if we are witnessing the birth of a real mass Black movement, after all these years. - Everybody knows that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is in trouble with Black folks, who are outraged at the lawlessness and violence of the city’s police. But political analyst, author and activist Paul Street says Mayor Emanuel has also lost the confidence of the rich white people who really call the shots in Chicago. Paul Street’s latest book is titled “They Rule: The 1% Versus Democracy.” - Last year, President Obama succeeded in putting his Trans Pacific Partnership corporate trade treaty on a “fast track” towards ratification by Congress. But opponents of TPP think they have a good chance of defeating the treaty in the New Year. Kevin Zeese is with Popular Resistance, - Talks are scheduled to begin on January 25th between the U.S. and its allies and their jihadist proxies seeking to oust the government of Syria, and the Syrian government and its Russian allies. The Americans, Saudis and Turks like to describe their Islamist proxies as “moderate rebels,” but Syria and the Russians say the western-backed fighters are terrorists, just like ISIS and al-Qaida. We spoke with Sara Flounders, the United National Anti-War Coalition. - Black America may, or may not, be in the process of creating a new political movement. However, building a movement based on people’s power is difficult when the political geography of Black America is so heavily influenced by non-profit organizations that are not accountable to the people. Black Agenda Report Managing Editor Bruce Dixon has this commentary.

Black Agenda Radio – 12.28.15

December 28, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – A conference on the Black Radical Tradition will be held at Temple University, in Philadelphia, January 8th through the 10th. Dr. Anthony Monteiro is one of the organizers, and a keynote speaker for the event. We asked Dr. Monteiro, How alive is the Black Radical Tradition, today? - Omali Yeshitela, chairman of the Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations, is wishing a very unhappy New Year to Wall Street and U.S. Imperialism. The consensus among the corporate media and the ruling circles in the United States is that the economy is doing fine, that the U.S. is nearing full employment, and that means the government will end its policy of giving trillions of dollars in interest-free money to the banks. But Omali Yeshitela says, the system is in deep crisis. - Earlier this year, a 27 year old teacher from Southeast Washington, DC, died at the hands of two Special Police officers. The recently formed Pan African Community Action group, or PACA, wants to take the case before the United Nations. PACA organizer Netfa Freeman explains.

Black Agenda Radio – 12.21.15

December 21, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – The mayor of majority Black Flint, Michigan declared a state of emergency, last week, after health officials discovered a “toxic soup” of pollutants in the city’s water – including a high risk of lead poisoning. The health crisis was created when an appointed emergency financial manager forced Flint to switch from Detroit’s water system, to Flint River water. Michigan Republican Governor Rick Snyder has appointed Emergency Financial Managers to dictate the affairs of virtually every majority Black city in the state, denying local populations control of their own institutions. In Detroit, water has been shut off to tens of thousands of poor people. We spoke with Thomas Stephens, a people’s lawyer who’s been active in the resistance to state and corporate takeovers in Michigan. - On January 8th through the 10th, Philadelphia’s Temple University will host a conference on the Black Radical Tradition. Keynote speakers include Angela Davis, Robin D.G. Kelly, Cornel West, V.J. Prashad, Anthony Monteiro, and Charlene Carruthers, of Chicago’s Black Youth Project 100. The title of the conference is "Reclaiming our Future: the Black Radical Tradition In Our Time." Larry Hamm, chairman of the Newark, New Jersey-based People’s Organization for Progress, will take part in one of the conference panels. There has not been a mass movement in Black America for a very long time. We asked Larry Hamm if the Black Radical Tradition is more than just an academic subject. - More than one hundred supporters of Mumia Abu Jamal gathered outside a Scranton, Pennsylvania, courtroom, as a federal judge heard arguments about why state prison authorities should be forced to treat Mumia for Hepatitis C. The nation’s best-known political prisoner came close to death, earlier this year, from complications of the disease. Joe Piette is a member of the Family and Friends of Mumia Abu Jamal. He says Mumia isn’t just fighting for himself. - New York based writer and political analyst Eric Draitser recently returned from a fact-finding trip to Venezuela, where the Socialist Party founded by the late Hugo Chavez lost badly to the rightwing opposition in legislative elections. The opposition won two-thirds of the seats in the national legislature. Draitser’s latest article on Venezuela is titled, “The Revolution That Will Not Die.” Although the Socialist project in Venezuela is not yet dead, Draitser agrees that it has suffered a major setback.

Black Agenda Radio – 11.30.15

November 30, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – A bill is moving through the U.S. House and Senate that would retroactively shorten sentences for crack cocaine possession and, its backers claim, substantially roll back mandatory minimum sentences for other crimes. The Sentencing Act is supported by the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union. However, the National Urban League and Families Against Mandatory Minimums have refused to sign off on the legislation, which actually expands the list of crimes subject to mandatory minimum sentencing, including gun possession and crimes of domestic violence. Listen to Julie Stewart, who is President of Families Against Mandatory Minimums. - Funds are being raised for a new documentary film on the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, with a focus on the late Panther leader, Huey P. Newton, and other Party founders, in Oakland, California. The project is headed up by David Hilliard, a former Panther chief of staff. Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Dante James will direct the movie. Both James and Hilliard have been critical of the film “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” directed by Stanley Nelson Jr. and distributed by PBS. Dante talked to us about the difference between the two films. - Trial has begun for the first of six Baltimore police officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray, last April, a homicide that set off a rebellion in the majority Black city. Baltimore is also the headquarters for the Real News Network, which held a fascinating discussion of the legal ramifications of the trial. Real News host Stephen Janis interviewed former Baltimore homicide detective Stephen Tabeling, who has a history of investigating cases of police use of deadly force, and Maryland Delegate Jill Carter, the most radical member of the state legislature, who hails from a civil rights family, and is also a defense attorney. Carter told the Real News why she’s worried about getting justice for Freddie Gray.

Black Agenda Radio – 11.23.15

November 23, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – The corporate media’s fixation with the attack on Paris seems insatiable, as if no place else in the world has suffered from terrorist attacks. Could it be because Paris is mostly white? Ajamu Baraka is a founder of the U.S. Human Rights Network and an editor and columnist for Black Agenda Report. Baraka’s current article is titled, “The Paris Attacks and the White Lives Matter Movement.” Baraka points out that the world capitals of death by terror are Nigeria, Iraq and Syria. Yet massacres in those places are not considered big news. - Environmental activists were planning to hold a huge demonstration in Paris later this month, to influence United Nations negotiations about climate change. However, French authorities have put the country under a state of emergency. Among those who planned to be in Paris is Kali Akuno, whose Malcolm X Grassroots Movement colleagues are promoting a plan for sustainable development in predominantly Black Jackson, Mississippi. It’s called the Jackson Just Transition Plan. Akuno says his delegation has held on to their plane tickets. - The Stop Mass Incarceration Network, co-founded by Carl Dix and Dr. Cornel West, followed up three days of protests in New York with demonstrations, this weekend, in several cities to refocus attention on Tamir Rice, the 12 year-old killed by Cleveland police. The local district attorney accused Tamir’s mother of having “economic motives” for demanding justice for her son. Carl Dix says the DA’s behavior is proof enough that the system is rigged. Carl Dix says nationwide protests are planned for December 3rd, the one-year anniversary of the exoneration of the cop that choked Eric Garner to death, in Staten Island, New York. - Investigative reporter Ken Silverstein says the Clinton Foundation’s newly released tax returns should land Bill, Hillary and daughter Chelsea Clinton in prison. In an article for Harper’s Magazine, Silverstein writes that the former – and possibly future – First Couple are implicated in massive money laundering and other High Crimes. - Kenia Serrano, the president of the Cuban Institute of Friendship of the People, spends lots of time greeting delegations of visitors to her island. But, this month Serrano and other Cuban officials were on a tour of U.S. cities, starting in New York. Speaking at John Jay College, Serrano said Cubans are proud of the changes the Revolution has made in the lives of the people.

Black Agenda Radio – 11.16.15

November 16, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – A bipartisan coalition of Republicans and Democrats is backing a bill that would shorten some mandatory minimum prison sentences. The Sentencing Project, a Washington-based prison reform organization, held a teleconference. Glen Ford attended the teleconference. He challenged the idea that President Obama has been an ally of prison reform. That was the voice of political consultant Bob Craemer answering. - Sentencing Project executive director Marc Mauer said much more needs to be done to re-integrate former prison inmates back into society. - Also in Washington, the Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations gathered at Howard University for a national conference under the theme “Black Power Matters.” Black Is Back Coalition chairman Omali Yeshitela said Russia did the right thing by helping Syria defend itself from U.S.-backed jihadists. - Black Agenda Report senior columnist Margaret Kimberley also addressed the Black Is Back conference. Kimberley says Black people need to build a political movement with a global perspective. - BAR executive editor Glen Ford is a founding member of the Black Is Back Coalition. He talked about the critical importance of making demands of Power – like Coalition’s demand for Black Community Control of the Police - Herdosia Benton is straight-outa-Ferguson, Missouri, and a key organizer in the Uhuru Movement, part of the Black Is Back Coalition. - Bruce Dixon, the Managing Editor of Black Agenda Report, is glad to see that there’s a whole new crop of Black activists out there. The problem is, many of them can’t seem to figure out how to formulate demands, of power.

Black Agenda Radio – 11.09.15

November 9, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – A conference on the Black radical tradition is scheduled for January 8th through 10th at Philadelphia’s Temple University. Dr. Anthony Monteiro, who was until recently a professor of African American Studies at Temple, is one of the conference organizers. Dr. Monteiro says it’s time for the Black liberation movement to get focused. - Dr. Gerald Horne, the professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston, is one of the most prolific Black scholars of modern times. Much of his recent work has focused on the origins of the United States as a bulwark of slavery and racist reaction. Dr. Horne’s news book is titled, “Confronting Black Jacobins: The U.S., the Haitian Revolution, and the Origins of the Dominican Republic.” Horne sees his book as an update on the late, great C.L.R. James’s 1938 classic, “The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution.” - Two Black farmers organizations, one in the U.S. Deep South, the other in Central America, have been awarded the 2015 Food Sovereignty Prize. But, what is food sovereignty? We asked Beverly Bell, coordinator of Other Worlds and an associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, in Washington.

Black Agenda Radio – 11.02.15

November 2, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – Outrage continues to build Richland County, South Carolina, where a white policeman was caught on video manhandling a Black female high school student. Efia Wangaza is a people’s lawyer and director of the Malcolm X Center for Self-Determination, in Greenville, South Carolina. She’s part of a coalition of citizens and parents that have launched a series of actions against in-school violence, especially against Black girls. - The school-to-prison pipeline starts before Black and brown students even set foot in kindergarten, according to a new study by the Center for American Progress and the National Black Child Development Institute. Researcher Maryam Adamu says the study shows that lasting harm is inflicted on Black and brown children in pre-school, where they suffer disproportionate suspensions and expulsions. - Activists in Newark, New Jersey, turned out for a forum organized to prepare for the installation of a new Civilian Complaint Review Board, appointed by Mayor Ras Baraka. The Black-led People’s Organization for Progress , P.O.P, will be represented on the board, along with other community groups. Larry Adams is vice-chairman of POP. He says the Review Board MUST the power to subpoena witnesses and police records. - The nation Haiti held a second round of elections on October 25th, this time for president. Back in August, legislative elections were marred by massive voter suppression by allies of the current government. The Boston-based Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti set up a hot-line to report irregularities in both elections. The first tallies from October’s presidential ballots should be released, later this week. But, Institute director Brian Concannon says the U.S.-backed Haitian regime has tampered with that election, too. - The Haiti Action Committee, based in the San Fransisco Bay Area, was part of a human rights and labor fact-finding delegation to the island nation. Haiti Action’s Pierre Labossiere and his colleagues believe the turnout of voters was NOT low, but that the vote was suppressed by the ruling party. He disputes that only 20 to 30 percent of Haitians attempted to vote.

Black Agenda Radio – 10.26.15

October 26, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – Thousands of protesters from around the country descended on New York City for three days of protests against police lawlessness. The Rise Up October demonstrations were called by the Stop Mass Incarceration Network, founded by Carl Dix and Dr. Cornel West. At Brooklyn’s Borough Hall and Manhattan’s Times Square, activists remembered the lives and the names of those snuffed out by the police. - While Rise Up October activists were demonstrating in New York, families of victims of police violence were testifying before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, in Washington. The Commission is an investigatory arm of the Organization of American States. Officials from the U.S. State Department and the Department of Justice were also on hand, as Martinez Sutton recounted the day the cops killed his sister. - Attorney Justin Hansford also testified before the Organization of American States commission. Hansford is a professor at the St. Louis University School of Law, who was involved in a Black citizens’ suit against police departments in St. Louis County. He said the U.S. criminal justice system is soaked in blood, and needs to be dismantled. - The Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations holds its annual rally and march on the White House, November 7, followed the next day by a conference at Howard University. The Coalition is demanding Black Community Control of the Police, and will march under the banner “Black Power Matters.” But, there has been no real discussion of the MEANING of Black Power, in many years. We spoke with Black Is Back chairman Omali Yeshitela. - Black congregations around the country are on alert, in the wake of arson attacks on seven Black churches in St. Louis, Missouri. Rev. Anthony Evans is president of the National Black Church Initiative, in Washington. He says the U.S. Justice Department appears “impotent” in the face of seven church burnings in St. Louis and “systematic” attacks against Blacks by racist police. - In St. Louis, Faizan Syed, director of the local chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, expressed solidarity with the Black Christian community. - Mumia Abu Jamal, the nation’s best known political prisoner, is still being denied treatment for Hepatitis-C, the underlying cause of his near-death health crisis, earlier this year. Mumia isn’t alone. Tens of thousands of inmates suffering from the infection are left untreated in Pennsylvania and other prison systems around the country. At a press conference, last week, Dr. Melissa Barber, of IFCO, the Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization, charged the U.S. with violating the human rights of prisoners. Dr. Barber runs a program that sends U.S. students to Cuba for free medical school.

Black Agenda Radio – 10.19.15

October 19, 2015

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective. – A broad coalition of activist organizations is gearing up for three days of Rise Up October protests against police lawlessness, in New York City, this weekend. Organizers plan to bring in 100 family members of victims of police violence from around the country. Newark, New Jersey’s People’s Organization for Progress is part of the Rise Up October campaign. Chairman Larry Hamm says POP has been fighting police brutality in northern New Jersey for 35 years. POP sent several busloads to Washington, DC for the recent anniversary of the Million Man March. - Cynthia McKinney, the former six-term congresswoman from Georgia and 2008 presidential candidate on the Green Party ticket, recently earned her PhD in Leadership and Change from Antioch University. For her dissertation, McKinney explored the challenges faced by the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. She’s now exploring ways to deploy more “non-traditional” Black candidates for Congress. But, that’s easier said than done. - Mustapha Hefny was born in Egypt and immigrated to the United States more than three decades ago. The U.S. government granted him citizenship, but it refuses to acknowledge that he’s a Black man. Mr. Hefny is a Nubian, an ancient, unmistakably Black people who were part of the Egyptian Empire, sometimes ruling as Pharoahs. Nubians have always lived in what is now southern Egypt and northern Sudan. But the United States classifies Nubian immigrants from southern Egypt as white, and Nubians from northern Sudan as Black, under Directive 15 of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. So, for almost 30 years, Mostapha Hefny has been demanding that United States recognize him as a Black man. - Dr. Gerald Horne, the professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston, has written yet another book. Horne is one of the most prolific and influential Black political thinkers of our time. His most recent work is titled “Race to Revolution: The U.S. and Cuba During the Slavery and Jim Crow.” His new book, on the Haitian Revolution, should be out this week. And after that, Dr. Horne plans on turning out books on Paul Robeson and Black majority rule in South Africa. He was recently interviewed on WFHB Community Radio, in Bloomington, Indiana.
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