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Fearless Parent Radio – Essure Dangers: Permanent Birth Control Pain – 10.07.15

Essure is a kind of non-surgical sterilization that was approved by the FDA in 2002. Since then, three-quarters of a million women have signed up. We’re talking about the insertion of metal coils inside the fallopian tubes, which is supposed to prevent hookups between egg and sperm.

A one-time, hassle-free procedure. Modern technology has surely improved upon the IUD of yore, right?

It sounds simple enough.

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Fearless Parent Radio – Why My Brain Isn’t Working (Like It Should) – 09.30.15

We’re a nation beseiged with brain damage. Cognitive problems, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Multiple Sclerosis. Autism. ADHD. Check out the mind boggling index of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and your brain will surely hurt.

This is not something that luminosity.com can handle.

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Fearless Parent Radio – Child Obesity Today – 09.09.15

Americans are ballooning up — adults and kids alike. Suddenly, normal food portions are super sized, clothing manufacturers are resorting to sizes 0, 00, and even 000 to avoid offending touchy customers, and people are spilling over the armrests of their airplane seats.

We’re left wondering… what on earth happened?

What are the repercussions of this alarming trend?

What do we need to do about it?

Host Carla Atherton interviews David White about his Childhood Obesity Project:

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Fearless Parent Radio – The Mitochondrial Link – 09.02.15

The mitochondria have important things to do, including production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP—the universal energy molecule), cellular apoptosis, calcium homeostasis, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

Mitochondria are the engines of our cells, and so it follows that mitochondrial health is related to all other aspects of health. Mitochondria are mighty, but they are also vulnerable, and are damaged by many of the toxins in our world.

So, what does this mean exactly?

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Fearless Parent Radio – Can Science Teach Kids About Humanity? – 08.26.15

Guest // David George Haskell, PhD

Host // Louise Kuo Habakus

forest unseen jacketThe #1 ranked high school in the country is requiring this book, The Forest Unseen, as summer reading for all incoming freshmen. I picked it up and was hooked. The premise is simple — what can we learn by closely observing the same square meter of forest over a one year period?

It’s no surprise that the forest can teach us biology. But does it also hold lessons about social connections, social responsibility, and our essential humanity?

Yes.

Imagine a contemporary biologist who writes like a poet — giddy with delight about the surprises and secrets that Nature will disclose to anyone who cares to take a closer look.

We know that our kids need to spend more time outdoors. For this to happen, maybe parents need a dose of inspiration, too. This isn’t a quick read; you won’t (and shouldn’t) knock it off your list in a weekend. I’m reading it with my boys, individually. Each is drawn to different ideas — the brutal parasitism of the horsetail worm… stripping naked in -20F weather to experience winter as the chickadees do — but it feeds curiosity and spurs some terrific conversations.

If you’re headed to the lake or mountains — or wish you were — this is the perfect summer read. The chapters are short and the insights are unexpected. It’s no wonder that this book was a finalist for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize and received numerous awards, including the National Academies’ Best Book Award for 2013, the 2013 Reed Environmental Writing Award, and the 2012 National Outdoor Book Award for Natural History Literature. A profile in The New York Times said that Haskell “gives the natural world the kind of open-minded attention one expects from a Zen monk rather than a hypothesis-driven scientist.”

david haskellDavid George Haskell, PhD holds degrees from the University of Oxford and Cornell University. He is Professor of Biology at the University of the South, where he served as Chair of Biology. His scientific research on animal ecology, evolution, and conservation has been sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the World Wildlife Fund, among others. David serves on the boards and advisory committees of local and regional land conservation groups. His classes have received national attention for the innovative ways they combine science, contemplation, and action in the community. David was born in England, raised in Paris, educated at Oxford and Cornell, and now lives in Tennessee where he helps his wife run a CSA called Cudzoo Farm.

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Fearless Parent Radio – Beyond Diet & Nutrition: Overlooked Healing Strategies – 08.19.15

Guest // Patricia Lemer, LPC

Host // Beth Lambert

palmer-reflexWhen a child is sick and parents are in “get it done” mode, stand back. We’re booking appointments, stocking up on supplies, recruiting therapists, setting up protocols, implementing new programs, and buying lots (and lots) of supplements. It’s a relief to be productive but the feeling doesn’t last. Our frenzied, sleepless activity gives way to a kind of unnatural calm where we ask:

What am I missing?

There are elements of a child’s growth and development that are almost always overlooked. This is true for all children but it’s especially true for those on a healing journey. For example:

State-of-the-art won’t mean a thing if the basics aren’t covered — think: sleep, sunshine, laughter.
What are retained primitive reflexes and what do they have to do with memory, sensory integration, emotional maturity, eating, handwriting, and stress management (among many, many others)?
Did you know that visual acuity (i.e., can your child see the blackboard?) is just one component of vision?
patty lemer headshotPatricia S. Lemer is a Licensed Professional Counselor, and practiced as an educational diagnostician for over 40 years. She was co-founder and Executive Director of Developmental Delay Resources (DDR), and international, non-profit organization for 20 years. DDR merged with Epidemic Answers in 2013, and Patty serves as Board Chair. She holds a Masters of Education in counseling and learning disabilities from Boston College and a Masters in Business from John Hopkins University. Patty lectures internationally on developmental delays, including autism spectrum disorders. From 2012-2014, she served as Chief Consultant in the establishment of a center for young adults with disabilities in Kuwait. She is the author of EnVISIONing a Bright Future: Interventions that Work for Children and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders, and Outsmarting Autism. Visit her website for more information.

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Fearless Parent Radio – Raising Sex-Healthy Kids – 08.12.15

Guest // Jennifer Wiessner, LCSW, AASECT

Host // Carla Atherton

Sex ed. Those two words are enough to have many of us running for the hills. Fall in, parents! Kids are consuming more media than ever before and the not-so-hidden messaging about sex is everywhere. Hate to break it to you but sex education is important for children BEFORE their school’s typical initiation in fifth grade. The good news is, it’s easier to talk about sex when children are younger. Legions of parents can tell you what happens if you wait too long — the never ending eye roll isn’t the half of it.

Join host Carla Atherton and her favorite sex ed guru on kids and the “birds and the bees”:

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Fearless Parent Radio – Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergies – 08.05.15

Guest // Lawrence Caprio, ND

Host // Mary Coyle, DIHom

Childhood illness has changed so much since the early 20th century. Mortality rates are down markedly, and that’s a good thing. But we seem to have traded infectious disease for chronic illness.

Some of most common afflictions affecting so many children are allergies — food, environmental, and idiopathic in origin. Parents and clinicians alike are bewildered. Why are kids so darn red and itchy, bumpy and rashy anyway? Debating the causes doesn’t get us far. We’re more concerned about relief.

What happens if you don’t treat allergies?
What are the most effective allergy treatments?
What’s the relationship between allergy symptoms and chronic illness?
What’s possible for children when allergy treatment is effective?
Lawrence Caprio, ND recognized early in his career the importance of allergy treatment as an effective adjunct to the management of the majority of chronic degenerative diseases seen in medical practice today. Subsequently, he was among the first to pioneer the Interro System of computerized testing developed in Provo, Utah and the science of ‘phenolic food compounds’ researched by Dr. Robert Gardiner at Brigham Young University. Dr. Caprio successfully integrated these modalities and developed a uniquely effective system of non-invasive allergy testing and sublingual immunotherapy which he currently uses. This system of computerized non-invasive electrodermal testing and optimal dose sub-lingual immunotherapy allows for the safe, rapid desensitization of acute allergy symptoms, as well as the effective long term management of chronic allergic problems. Dr Caprio attended the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Oregon, where he obtained his degree in 1979. Since that time, he has built a successful 35+ year practice of Naturopathic and Preventive Medicine in Westport, CT. He treats patients worldwide.

field-day-matt-hern

Fearless Parent Radio – Compulsory Education: Is This the Only Option for Our Youth?

Carla Atherton interviews Matt Hern, lecturer, writer, historian, about lifelong learning, self-directed learning, deschooling, and compulsory education – tune in for an inspiring discussion about how we can better unleash our children’s minds and inspire them in their learning.

Matt Hern lives and works in East Vancouver, Coast Salish Territories, with his partner and daughters. He has founded and directed the Purple Thistle Centre, Car-Free Vancouver Day and Groundswell: Grassroots Economic Alternatives among many other community projects. His books and articles have been published on all six continents and translated into ten languages. He currently teaches in CBU’s MBA program is an Adjunct Professor in UBC’s SCARP program. He has taught at many other universities, and continues to lecture globally. To learn more about Matt, visit his website.