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Trends This Week – “We did it” is out; optimism is in – 01.11.17

Since Trump’s victory – with Hollywood in mourning, the mainstream media obsessing over who hacked what and President Obama trying to rewrite the history of his eight years of failures – in the real world, consumer confidence surged to a 15-year high in December and optimism spiked the most since 1980. Celente breaks it down.

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Trends This Week – Crybaby liberals can’t get over the election – 01.04.17

From blaming Hillary Clinton’s loss on alleged Russian hacking to screaming “fake news, fake news” at every turn, liberals, aided and abetted by the mainstream media, just can’t get over November 8. And, as Gerald Celente so powerfully points out, they’re embarking on a fast-moving downward spiral.

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Trends This Week – How Trump has changed everything – 12.21.16

How Trump has changed everything
Global forecaster Gerald Celente – calling it as it is, not how he wants it to be – breaks down how Donald Trump’s election signals the end to politics as usual and why the economy could very well turn. He also covers the coming cashless world, reefer money madness and Obama’s exit from politics.

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Trends This Week – A Trump economy and other Top Trends 2017 – 12.14.16

Approve or disapprove of his choices, Trump has picked a corporate cabinet of top notch business leaders. Unlike politicians, Trump will run the White House like he runs his businesses; it’s about the bottom line. Look for a strong dollar and steady economic growth. For US exporters, however, the strong dollar will dampen profits. Other 2017 trends include the death of the Fourth Estate, worldwide movements to “Make It New” and more.

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Trends This Week – What 2017 has in store for you – 12.07.16

Global forecaster Gerald Celente unveils his Top Trends for 2017. From Americans electing Donald Trump president – the darkest of dark-horse candidates whom the Trends Journal® was the first publication to forecast as winner (Trends Journal, May 2016) – to economic, financial, entertainment, technological and pop-culture mega-trends that will shape 2017, be ready to ride the waves and survive the dives ahead. This one’s a must listen show. Learn more at Trendsresearch.com.

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Trends This Week – The larger meaning behind Trump’s victory – 11.16.16

Liberals, stop whining. Donald Trump’s victory is more than an election triumph, it is a cultural socio-economic shift of seismic scale. It extends beyond the insular thinking and entrenched practices of the two dominant parties; rather, it signals the imminent destruction of systems and leaders who have failed for too long. It is also time for the rise a true third party.

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Trends This Week – Trump victory no suprise to Celente – 11.09.16

As the Trends Research Institute repeatedly forecast, Donald J. Trump, riding a global-rising wave of anti-establishment and anti-elitism anger, stunned the world Tuesday by resoundingly defeating Hillary Clinton in the race for the White House. Trump’s victory may have stunned the world, but not trend forecaster Gerald Celente, who was the first to predict Trump would beat all odds and become the nation’s 45th president.

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Trends This Week – Fear index is rising – 11.02.16

The Stock Market “fear index” is spiking, the dollar’s declining and gold prices are rising. Is it the US elections that spreading fear, or is fear of a troubled global economy? Geopolitical tensions are rising. From Saudi Arabia to Sudan, from Yemen to Russia, real conflicts are erupting and McCarthyism propaganda from the US are setting the stage for spreading wars.

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Trends This Week – The restaurant recession and what it means? – 10.19.16

Across America, from established restaurant chains to upstarts, bankruptcies are rising, locations are closings and profit margins are shrinking. Restaurant Chain CEOs blame it on everything from the deplorable election season dragging down the mood of the country to global geo-political tensions. “It’s the economy, stupid,” not the presidential elections or consumer uncertainty, that’s keeping people from eating out. More than a restaurant recession, it is a precursor of a national recession.