1

Progressive Commentary Hour – 02.02.16

Dr. Guy McPherson is a professor emeritus of Natural Resources, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Arizona. He has specialized in forest resources, energy decline and climate change and its economic consequences. In the past he has also taught at Texas A&M and University of California at Berkeley. Having become disillusioned with the American university environment and academia, and after attempts by university officials to silence his outspokenness about the human causes of climate change, Guy abandoned his tenured position as a full professor for ethical reasons of conscience. He is the author of several books, the latest co-written with Carolyn Baker entitled “Extinction Dialogs: How to Live with Death in Mind.” He is also the co-host of the radio program Nature Bats Last heard every Tuesday evening at 3 pm Eastern time on the Progressive Commentary Hour. His website is GuyMcpherson.com

Prof. Paul Beckwith is a post doctoral candidate in the Laboratory of Paleoclimatology and Climatology at the University of Ottawa in Ontario, where he also teaches as a part time professor. Paul’s research specializes in abrupt effects from climate change (such as tornados and the rise in more fierce tropical storms), greenhouse gas emissions, the global implications of the melting Arctic ice sheets, and social media for climate change advocacy. He is a member and participant in the Arctic Methane Emergency Group and the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society. His website is PaulBeckwith.net

1

Leid Stories – 07.29.15

The 2016 Duopoly Doo-Wop: Are They Singing Your Tune? (Part 2) We pick up from where we left off with yesterday’s discussion on  the 2016 presidential race and listeners’ reactions not only to how it’s shaping up, but how it’s shaping their political attitudes and decisions. A crowded field of declared candidates—16 from the Republican Party and five Democrats so …

Cotton Isn’t as Innocent as You Think By Kelly Bryant

On the surface, cotton just doesn’t have a very threatening ring to it. Associations with fluffy cumulus clouds and storybook characters like Peter Cottontail have probably contributed to its cuddly reputation. Its industry touts it as the fabric of our lives. But cotton isn’t so one-dimensional, and underneath the conventional variety lies a darker side. For instance, while fabric made of …