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Dedrick Asante-Muhammad and Chuck Collins – America’s Racial Wealth Divide Is Nothing Short of Shocking

Most media coverage of racial injustice has understandably focused on our country’s unfair policing and criminal justice system. But to fully understand the current reality of racial inequality in America, we also need to take an honest look at our nation’s shocking wealth disparities. Wealth — the total assets a family owns after the bills are paid — is the …

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Science Shows Us Precisely Why Trees Literally Help Reduce Stress

(UR) It’s no secret: trees are an integral part of how we live on this planet. From their well-known and vital role in the oxygen cycle, and their importance to their ecosystems — they are also central to the human food system. But trees also have other, less obviously integral benefits that manifest in our lives. Sure, without trees it would definitely be harder to breathe — …

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Academics can change the world – if they stop talking only to their peers

Research and creative thinking can change the world. This means that academics have enormous power. But, as academics Asit Biswas and Julian Kirchherr have warned, the overwhelming majority are not shaping today’s public debates. Instead, their work is largely sitting in academic journals that are read almost exclusively by their peers. Biswas and Kirchherr estimate that an average journal article is “read completely by …

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Charles Eisenstein – The Waters of Heterodoxy: Gerald Pollack’s “The Fourth Phase of Water”

In “The Fourth Phase of Water,” Gerald Pollack offers an elegant new theory of water chemistry that has profound implications not only for chemistry and biology, but for the metaphoric foundation of our understanding of reality and our treatment of nature. Let me emphasize that this is not a New Age book by someone of questionable scientific credentials. This is a book …

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Resistance Radio – Juliee de la Terre and William Greendeer – 01.10.16

Juliee de la Terre, She holds an MS from the Gaylord Nelson Institute for environmental studies at University of Wisconsin Madison. She has been an activist since she was a child helping her mother care for injured wildlife. She owned a chemical free landscaping business for almost two decades which emphasized removing lawns and restoring native plants. As an environmental consultant she assisted the Ho-Chunk Nation in efforts to design and implement an place based ecological immersion project on their land near Black River Falls with the intention of immersing young tribal members in nature while learning their language and culture. Recently, she assisted Ho-Chunk Tribal member William Greendeer in introducing the Rights of Nature into the Ho-Chunk constitution. She maintains her bog called “Sacred Water Sacred Land” about the sacredness of al things and also “Heart of the Ho-Chunk” with William Greendeer about Ho-Chunk culture and the environment. She is a professor of natural science at Viterbo University.

William Greendeer is an elder in the Ho-Chunk Nation whose territory recently spanned WI, MN, IL and IA. He is Deer Clan and member of the medicine lodge. His first 8 summers were spent in a lodge and he has a deep connection to the natural world. William experiences sacred connection with the natural world and offers prayer when harvesting a plant or animal. He is teaching how to live in good way on his land in southwest WI. He hopes to rejuvenate his old farm with native plants and also by protecting the beavers that make their home in his valley. His family’s land and many of his tribal members’ land have been affected by frac sand mining activities in addition to the damage caused by the cranberry growing industry in southwest WI. He introduced a rights of nature amendment at general counsel in September with 3/4 of the tribal members supporting it. He hopes have the rights of nature in tribal law will help the tribe protect their sacred land, water and all our relations.

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A Compassionate Approach Leads to More Help and Less Punishment

Seeing a child steal a toy from a fellow playmate. Watching a stranger cut in line at the grocery store. When we witness something unjust, our emotions often shape our behavior both toward the person wronged and the wrongdoer. But why we help the victim in some cases or punish the transgressor in others isn’t that simple, according to researchers …