Afghanistan

Kevin Ryan – Investigating 9/11 and Naming Suspects

March 1, 2016

When people ask me what more can be done to achieve 9/11 truth and justice, I tell them to spend less time calling for a new investigation and more time investigating. Even without subpoena power, independent investigators can make a lot of progress. To help with that effort, here are three steps for an independent investigation and an objective way to evaluate suspects in the 9/11 crimes. The first step is to ask specific, well-formulated questions. What do we need to know? We need to know things like how explosives got into the WTC, how the North American air defenses failed, how the U.S. chain of command and communication systems failed, how the alleged hijackers got away with so much, and how the planes were hijacked. Here are examples of specific questions that will help answer these questions. What more can we learn from the official accounts about transponder and autopilot use on 9/11? Who was invited to the explosive disposal/terrorism meeting at WTC 7 on the morning 9/11 and what was the agenda? What do the strip clubs, bars, and other businesses frequented by the alleged hijackers have in common? Read

Gary Null, PhD – The Gulf War Syndrome Plot: The US Government’s Conspiracy of Silence and Obstruction Against Gulf War Veterans

February 25, 2016

With only 148 Americans officially killed in action and only 467 wounded, the Gulf War seemed to be a shining victory for our military and its leaders. However, this victory has cast a long, lingering shadow. Today we know that nearly 200,000 of our Gulf service men and women are suffering from a debilitating and sometimes deadly syndrome. The suffering our military personnel have endured from Gulf War syndrome is outrageous in and of itself; however, the US government’s decades-long denial that the illness even exists has compounded the problem tremendously.

Alfred W. McCoy – How a Pink Flower Defeated the World’s Sole Superpower

February 22, 2016

After fighting the longest war in its history, the United States stands at the brink of defeat in Afghanistan. How can this be possible? How could the world’s sole superpower have battled continuously for 15 years, deploying 100,000 of its finest troops, sacrificing the lives of 2,200 of those soldiers, spending more than a trillion dollars on its military operations, lavishing a record hundred billion more on “nation-building” and “reconstruction,” helping raise, fund, equip, and train an army of 350,000 Afghan allies, and still not be able to pacify one of the world’s most impoverished nations? So dismal is the prospect for stability in Afghanistan in 2016 that the Obama White House has recently cancelled a planned further withdrawal of its forces and will leave an estimated 10,000 troops in the country indefinitely. Were you to cut through the Gordian knot of complexity that is the Afghan War, you would find that in the American failure there lies the greatest policy paradox of the century: Washington’s massive military juggernaut has been stopped dead in its steel tracks by a pink flower, the opium poppy. Read

Study: Single Session Of Ayahuasca Defeats Depression

February 22, 2016

The World Heath Organization reports that worldwide, an estimated 350 million people of all ages suffer from depression. According to the WHO, depression is the leading cause of disability around the globe and is a major contributor to the overall global burden of disease. Ayahuasca, a psychotropic brew of two plants, the vine Banisteriopsis caapi and the leaves of the shrubPsychotria viridis, has been used for centuries in healing ceremonies in the Amazon. In the last few years ayahuasca has gained prominence on a global scale, with thousands traveling across the world to participate in indigenous ceremonies in South America, most notably in Peru. Concomitant with the growing popularity of ayahuasca as a tool for spiritual and physical healing is an increased scientific interest in understanding the biomedical underpinnings and treatment ramifications of this powerful medicine. Recently, one of the most prestigious scientific journals, Nature, highlighted research conducted by a team of Brazilian from the University of São Paulo on the antidepressant effects of a single dose of ayahuasca on a group of six individuals suffering from major depression. In that study, researchers demonstrated that ayahuasca was able to alleviate symptoms of depression within hours of intake and that the antidepressant effects persisted for weeks afterward. Read

Robert Fisk – Isis and the Taliban are brutally carving up modern Afghanistan

February 16, 2016

If anyone wants to understand the shame of Afghanistan – the yearly cull of civilians, the beheadings, the execution by single shots, the kidnapping of women – they have only to read the shocking UN report just published in Kabul. It is laced with fearful eyewitness descriptions of brutality. Isis features in its 87 pages with its usual depravity (in Afghanistan, of course, not in Iraq or Syria) and the report’s statistics show clearly that, last year, there were more civilians killed or wounded in the country than in any year since 2009.  In 2015 alone, 3,545 civilians were killed and 7,457 injured. Since 2009, the total civilian dead – not soldiers, militiamen or Taliban – comes to 21,323 dead. And this, remember, is the graveyard of empires into which we blithely trod after 9/11 on the basis that we would not “forget” Afghanistan again. We would see it through to the end. The Taliban, in the words of a Canadian commander, were “scumbags”. Our soldiers would not die in vain. And it has come to this. Read

TIM BISSELL – 10 Secret CIA Prisons You Do Not Want To Visit

February 15, 2016

The US Central Intelligence Agency has, according to multiple investigative reports from both mainstream media outlets and human rights organizations, operated numerous “black sites” across the world. These locations, according to the reports, are secret prisons used to house “ghost prisoners.” Those sent to these places are held captive without being charged with any crime and are not allowed any form of legal defense. Ghost prisoners are subject to what the CIA calls “enhanced interrogation tactics”; most others call it torture. The CIA and their operatives’ methods allegedly include waterboarding, sleep deprivation, humiliation, physical beatings, electric shocks, and worse. These secret prisons, dotted all over the world, might just be the most terrifying places on Earth. Read

James Jordan – Nothing to do, nowhere to go, nothing to say: How the broad climate movement has failed us

February 9, 2016

January 13, 2016 – Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal – It has been a month since the UN climate summit in Paris, aka COP 21. One might expect the kind of ebb and flow we often see in popular movements. Interest in climate issues, the cause of the day during the summit, might be expected to wane and move to the back burner of public discourse until such time as another development pushes it forward again.   However, climate change is fundamentally different. It is going to get worse — we will be getting slapped in the face with this one for a long, long time, even under the best scenarios. Only a few weeks after COP 21, the world experienced a wave of floods and extreme weather exacerbated by global warming. In the US, there were record-setting floods along the Mississippi River. In South America, floods caused the evacuation of 180,000 persons. In Scotland, floods cut across class lines to threaten a historic castle neighboring the Queen’s Balmoral residence, its foundation being eaten away by the swollen Dee river. Meanwhile, oil wars and drought continue to drive an immigration crisis in Syria and throughout the Middle East and Northern Africa.

Tom Engelhardt – Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda

February 9, 2016

Here’s my twenty-first-century rule of thumb about this country: if you have to say it over and over, it probably ain’t so. Which is why I’d think twice every time we’re told how “exceptional” or “indispensable” the United States is. For someone like me who can still remember a moment when Americans assumed that was so, but no sitting president, presidential candidate, or politician felt you had to say the obvious, such lines reverberate with defensiveness. They seem to incorporate other voices you can almost hear whispering that we’re ever less exceptional, more dispensable, no longer (to quote the greatest of them all by his own estimate) “the greatest.” In this vein, consider a commonplace line running around Washington (as it has for years): the U.S. military is “the finest fighting force in the history of the world.” Uh, folks, if that’s so, then why the hell can’t it win a damn thing 14-plus years later? If you don’t mind a little what-if history lesson, it’s just possible that events might have turned out differently and, instead of repeating that “finest fighting force” stuff endlessly, our leaders might actually believe it. After all, in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, it took the Bush administration only a

Canada’s top Google search: Sponsoring a Syrian refugee is all the rage in Canada.

January 21, 2016

Last September, after the photograph of three-year-old Alan Kurdi’s body on that Turkish beach hit the world’s front pages, the top Google search term in Canada was, “How to sponsor a Syrian?” The news media here, in the midst of covering a federal election campaign, jumped all over the Kurdi story. Not just because it was tragic, nor because of the Kurdi family’s Canadian connection through the toddler’s Vancouver-based aunt, but because the country, bitterly divided over the former Conservative government’s attitudes towards Muslims, suddenly didn’t recognise itself as the welcoming, multicultural nation it had long believed itself to be. And so, on TV, online and in print, there were stories on how many refugees were expected, how few the Stephen Harper regime had approved, and how Canadians, individually, in groups and as part of community organisations, could sponsor Syrian refugee families. Read

Paul Craig Roberts – The 21st Century: An Era Of Fraud

January 19, 2016

In the last years of the 20th century fraud entered US foreign policy in a new way.  On false pretenses Washington dismantled Yugoslavia and Serbia in order to advance an undeclared agenda.  In the 21st century this fraud multiplied many times. Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, and Libya were destroyed, and Iran and Syria would also have been destroyed if the President of Russia had not prevented it.  Washington is also behind the current destruction of Yemen, and Washington has enabled and financed the Israeli destruction of Palestine.  Additionally, Washington operated militarily within Pakistan without declaring war, murdering many women, children, and village elders under the guise of “combating terrorism.”  Washington’s war crimes rival those of any country in history. I have documented these crimes in my columns and books (Clarity Press). Anyone who still believes in the purity of Washington’s foreign policy is a lost soul. Read
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