1.pg

Yearly cost of US premature births linked to air pollution: $4.33 billion

The annual economic cost of the nearly 16,000 premature births linked to air pollution in the United States has reached $4.33 billion, according to a report by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center. The sum includes $760 million spent on prolonged hospital stays and long-term use of medications, as well as $3.57 billion in lost economic productivity due to physical …

1

Has PBS Become a Front for Big Pharma?

A PBS Frontline documentary argues that supplements are useless—relying on “expert testimony” from paid Pharma representatives. Last week, PBS’s Frontline aired an hour-long program titled “Supplements and Safety.” Jointly produced by Frontline, the New York Times, and the Canadian Broadcasting Commission, the program was clearly intended to leave viewers with the one-sided impression that dietary supplements are unregulated, unsafe—and that …

1

Matthew Porterfield – TTIP and Climate Change: Low Economic Benefits, Real Climate Risks

Yves here. Readers may take exception to the posture of this paper, that the TTIP could be improved so as to eliminate its environment-negaive features. It’s hard to see those as anything other than features, that the authors were fully aware of how the TTIP would serve to weaken environmental, including climate-change-related regulations. Nevertheless, this article serves as a very …

1

STEVE HORN – “Miracle of American Oil”: Continental Resources Courted Corporate Media to Sell Oil Exports

A document published by the Public Relations Society of America, discovered by DeSmog, reveals that from the onset of its public relations campaign, the oil industry courted mainstream media reporters to help it sell the idea of lifting the ban on crude oil exports to the American public and policymakers. Calling its campaign the “Miracle of American Oil,” the successfulPR effort to push for Congress and the …

1

Barbara Ehrenreich – Dead, White, and Blue

The white working class, which usually inspires liberal concern only for its paradoxical, Republican-leaning voting habits, has recently become newsworthy for something else: according to economist Anne Case and Angus Deaton, the winner of the latest Nobel Prize in economics, its members in the 45- to 54-year-old age group are dying at an immoderate rate. While the lifespan of affluent whites continues …