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The Dr. Peter Breggin Hour – 03.21.17

One of my best hours! With British psychiatrist Joanna Moncrieff, this is a must-listen-to show. It is thoughtful from beginning to end about how psychiatric drugs really work by disrupting brain function and how they impair our ability to be “sensitive to complex aspects of the environment, such as other people.” I describe how, in my opinion, they are neurotoxins that reduce the individual’s capacity to care about anything including themselves and other people. Joanna and I do not fully agree on all the nuances of these issues, such as should antipsychotic drugs ever be used, and how common and severe are the long-term effects. These differences provide the listener with a unique opportunity to hear a genuine, informed, scientific, and caring discussion covering broad aspects and concerns pertaining to the whole range of psychiatric drugs.

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Progressive Commentary Hour – 02.14.17

Gary chats with PRN host Beatty Cohan on the top of LOVE, They duo go over the topics of Why are relationships so challenging? A Valentine’s day look at the state of love in the world, and in American culture in particular. How is the lack of love contributing to our culture of fear, resentment and hate, intolerance and social divisions? And how does the our culture climate politicize relationships and stifle social empathy, kindness and compassion.Our guest is Beatty Cohan — a psychotherapist for 35 years and a nationally recognized expert in marriage and relationship therapy and sexual dysfunction counseling. Her work also includes treating early child abuse, sexual assault and substance abuse. Beatty has been a columnist, a public speaker having given hundreds of presentations to national organizations, colleges and universities, a radio talk host, and a resident psychotherapeutic expert for major television networks.

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Ask Beatty – 02.06.17

DREAMS + HARD WORK+ MENTORING = SUCCESS

Whether you are struggling with mental health issues like depression, anxiety, substance abuse, obesity or relationship or sexual issues, the number one question that you need to ask yourself is whether you are really SERIOUS about acknowledging, addressing and resolving the challenges. In doing so, you will be able to position yourself to make your personal and professional dreams come true.

My guest today is Jan Mercer Darms, Founder & CEO of Swig and also Founder of 6-Figures, an experiential networking organization for highly accomplished profession women. Jan is an example of a woman of integrity, goodness kindness and political acumen, who has also been able to build two highly successful businesses.

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iEat Green – Jennifer Harris – 01.26.17

Dr. Jennifer L. Harris is Director of Marketing Initiatives at the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and Associate Professor in Allied Health Sciences at University of Connecticut. She leads a multidisciplinary team of researchers who study food marketing to children, adolescents, and parents, and how it impacts their diets and health. Dr. Harris received her B.A. from Northwestern University and M.B.A. in Marketing from The Wharton School. Before returning to graduate school, she was a marketing executive for eighteen years, including at American Express as a Vice President in consumer marketing and as principal in a marketing strategy consulting firm. Dr. Harris completed her PhD in Social Psychology at Yale University with Dr. John Bargh and Dr. Kelly Brownell. Dr. Harris is a leading expert on food marketing to youth, and her research is widely used by the public health community and policymakers to improve the food marketing environment surrounding children and adolescents in the United States and worldwide. Specific areas of research include monitoring and evaluating the amount, types, and nutrition quality of food and drinks marketed to youth and families; the psychology of food marketing and its impact on health behaviors; and identifying effective policy solutions. Her current research focuses on targeted marketing and health disparities affecting black and Hispanic youth; new forms of marketing targeted to youth on social media and mobile devices; and effects of food marketing on what and how parents feed their babies and young children.

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Glia, not neurons, are most affected by brain aging

The difference between an old brain and a young brain isn’t so much the number of neurons but the presence and function of supporting cells called glia. In Cell Reports on January 10, researchers who examined postmortem brain samples from 480 individuals ranging in age from 16 to 106 found that the state of someone’s glia is so consistent through …

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Ian Johnston – People with early signs of Alzheimer’s more than seven times more likely to be lonely

Loneliness could be a factor in Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research. Researchers used brain-imaging techniques to determine levels of amyloid – a protein associated with the disease – in the brains of a group of 79 apparently healthy people with an average age of 76. They then compared this to a test designed to find out how lonely someone …

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Caloric restriction can be beneficial to the brain, study shows

By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at VerticalNews Health — Studies of different animal species suggest a link between eating less and living longer, but the molecular mechanisms by which caloric restriction affords protection against disease and extends longevity are not well understood. New clues to help solve the mystery are presented in an article published in the September issue …

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What Women Must Know – The Spiritual Lessons from a Life with Horses with Dr. Allan Hamilton – 10.27.16

Allan Hamilton started his working life as a janitor. He would eventually go on to graduate from Harvard Medical School and complete his neurosurgical residency training at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Dr. Hamilton holds four Professorships at the University of Arizona in Neurosurgery, Radiation Oncology, Psychology, and Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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Valerie Strauss – How schools are turning ‘joy’ into a character strength — and why it’s an awful idea

Back in March I published a post titled, “Now some schools are testing kids for their ‘grit’ and ‘joy’ levels. Really.” For years we’ve heard of schools viewing “grit” as a character strength and moving to measure how much grit students have while attempting to build it up in those deficient. Now one of the co-authors of that post is …