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Energy Stew – Michael Tellinger – 05.19.17

Why has humanity been so inhumane? – Energy Stew interview with Michael Tellinger Michael Tellinger has a lot to tell us. He’s dedicated to the ancient history of South Africa and the information stored in the also ancient Sumerian tablets. These tablets and the innumerable stone temples still standing in South Africa reveal information that changes what we know about …

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Exposure to chemicals released during fracking may harm fertility

COLUMBIA, Mo. – More than 15 million Americans live within a one-mile radius of unconventional oil and gas (UOG) operations. UOGs combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” to release natural gas from underground rock. Scientific studies, while ongoing, are still inconclusive on the potential long-term effects fracturing has on human development. Today, researchers at the University of Missouri …

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The Natural Nurse And Dr. Z – Plants Go to War: A Botanical History of World War II – 07.19.16

Host Dr. Eugene Zampieron, ND, AHG , www.drznaturally.com, interviews botanist Judith Sumner. Judith specializes in ethnobotany, flowering plants, plant adaptations, and garden history. She has taught extensively both at the college level and at botanical gardens, including the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University and the Garden in the Woods, the foremost native plant garden of New England. Judith graduated from Vassar College and completed graduate studies in systematic botany at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She studied at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and at the British Museum (Natural History) and did extensive field work in the Pacific region on the genus Pittosporum. She has published monographic studies in the American Journal of Botany, Pollen et Spores, and Allertonia, as well as monographing two families for Flora Vitiensis Nova, the recently published flora of the Fiji Islands. Judith’s book American Household Botany won the American Horticultural Society Book Award. She was awarded the Gertrude B. Foster Award for Excellence in Herbal Literature by the Herb Society of America. On todays show, we will discuss Plants Go to War: A Botanical History of World War II – a look at military history from a botanical perspective, and the images say it all: From victory gardens and agriculture to rubber, coal, paper, timber, drugs, and fibers, plant products supplied the wartime materials that played key roles in victory.
CONTACT: www.judithsumner.com [includes a link to a recent lecture at Harvard on victory gardens]

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Report Shows How War Profiteers Are Now Refugee Profiteers, Too

As Europe comes to terms with a Brexit vote fueled in large part by anti-immigrant hate-mongering, a new report exposes how war profiteers are influencing EU policy to make money from unending Middle East conflicts as well as the wave of refugees created by that same instability and violence. The report (pdf), Border Wars: The Arms Dealers Profiting from Europe’s Refugee Tragedy, released jointly …

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Nature Bats Last – 09.01.15

This show we have a climate update, our Doomer of the Week and our guest Stephen Jenkinson. Jenkinson is a teacher, author, storyteller, spiritual activist, farmer and founder of the Orphan Wisdom School, a teaching house and learning house for the skills of deep living and making human culture. It is rooted in knowing history, being claimed by ancestry, working for a time ​yet to come.​ He is the author of a Die Wise, A Manifesto for Sanity and Soul.

burning earth

Climate Genocide

The planet has warmed by 0.85C since the industrial revolution, or since 1880, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which is the baseline for measurement by the scientific community. That doesn’t seem like much; it’s such a small number, less than one (1). But, remarkably, the increase of 0.85C happened within 150 years, whereas historically it normally …