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Infectious Myth – News Roundup – 11.17.15

In Episode 80 David updates us on vaccine problems, the problematic military malaria medication mefloquine (Lariam), the (in)justice system, Facilitated Communications and sexual assault. He discusses a case of a sports star who appears to have gone unpunished for a vicious assault, while another star was convicted in the public eye before the evidence point out it was a false allegation of rape. Colorado high school students drop their pants for each other. Who is a victim, who is a pedophile, and who is just a teenager exploring their sexuality? Yale students go into a tizzy when a professor says they are adults. Mizzu students fire their president, and then try to fire the press. And Amherst students want their president to apologize for all the wrongs in world history.

For a list of resources for further exploration of these stories see http://theinfectiousmyth.com/PRN-TIM/80.html

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Leid Stories – 11.10.15

At the University of Missouri, Truly A ‘Teachable Moment’ About Power

Ferguson, Missouri, Looks to Restore Trust with ‘Old-Style’ Policing

A weeklong hunger strike by University of Missouri graduate student Jonathan Butler was the catalyst for broader action against an administration that repeatedly failed to address complaints of racism and discrimination at the flagship Columbia campus. The students’ demands were met yesterday with the resignations of President Tim Wolfe and Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin. It’s a teachable moment, says Leid Stories.

Meanwhile, about 120 miles away, the City of Ferguson says it’s trying to bridge longstanding rifts between the community and police that exploded after 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot dead on Aug. 9 last year by Officer Darren Wilson. Interim Police Chief Andre Anderson began making the rounds to community groups last weekend with the good news of “old-style” policing.

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Christian Christensen – US Violence Breeds a Language of the Grotesque

Another week, another series of school and university shootings in the US, and another chance to hear phrases such as “active shooter” and “campus lockdown” repeated over and over by police, school administrators and journalists. These phrases – chilling in their clinicalness – are not only stark examples of the militarization of the language of everyday life, but also reminders of how the language …

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Shane Harris – Marines Trained That Rape in Afghanistan Is a ‘Cultural’ Issue

U.S. Marines preparing to go overseas are given a detailed training session about the Marine Corps’ own rules against sexual assault. But they are offered practically no guidance on what to do if they witness rape and other sexual abuses by “local nationals” in other countries, including Afghanistan, where child rape is common. A 45-minute scripted presentation given to Marines …

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Amie M. Gordon – Is it Time to Take the “Positive” Out of Positive Psychology?

What is the prescription for optimal living? The burgeoning field of positive psychology appears to have many of the answers: We should be kind and caring to others, forgiving of transgressions, gracious and compassionate in our daily lives, and upbeat and optimistic about the future. Following this simple plan should keep us happy and healthy. But as with most things, …

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Tom Engelhardt – Where Did the Antiwar Movement Go?

Let me tell you a story about a moment in my life I’m not likely to forget even if, with the passage of years, so much around it has grown fuzzy.  It involves a broken-down TV, movies from my childhood, and a war that only seemed to come closer as time passed. My best guess: it was the summer of …

Researchers’ discovery may explain difficulty in treating Lyme disease

Northeastern University researchers have found that the bad­terium that causes Lyme dis­ease forms for­mant per­sister cells, which are known to evade antibi­otics. This sig­nif­i­cant finding, they said, could help explain why it’s so dif­fi­cult to treat the infec­tion in some patients. “It hasn’t been entirely clear why it’s dif­fi­cult to treat the pathogen with antibi­otics since there has been no …

Student debt

The For-Profit College Scam – Dawn Lueck

This spring, around 100 indebted college grads came up with a novel strategy for dealing with their crushing debt: They simply weren’t going to pay it. These students — the so-called “Corinthian 100″ — attended schools owned by the now-defunct for-profit education conglomerate Corinthian Colleges. With over 100 campuses in the United States and Canada, Corinthian’s schools — including Everest …

vaccine_flu_jab_crediteuropean_commission_dg_echo_flickr

What is Vaccine Injury? – Cathy Jameson

Update on California’s SB277 – despite strong opposition from parents and providers from across the state, SB277 passed through the Judiciary Committee last week with a 5-1 vote.  Senator Joel Anderson  was the only no vote.  SB277 will go next to the Appropriations Committee. The archived video of the latest hearing can be found at this link: A press conference with Mary Holland, J.D. …

sexual-violence

Women are more likely to be physically assaulted in developed countries, study shows

When researchers examine violent assault numbers, historically the data has pointed to higher rates of female victimization in developing countries. But a study by a West Virginia University sociology professor finds that women in developed countries — like the United States — are actually more likely to be physically assaulted than women in developing countries. In “Individual and Structural Opportunities: …