Ocean

Oxygen-depleted oceans had key role in mass extinction over 200M years ago

Changes in the biochemical balance of the ocean were a crucial factor in the end-Triassic mass extinction, during which half of all plant, animal and marine life on Earth perished, according to new research involving the University of Southampton. The study, published in the upcoming edition of Geology, reveals that a condition called ‘marine photic zone euxinia’ took place in …

Global-Warming-3845

The price to be paid for not cutting emissions of greenhouse gases could mean driving the planet across planetary boundaries, or “tipping points”.

An international team of scientists has tried a new approach to addressing the complex argument about the costs of climate change – and, once again, the prediction is that the costs of inaction will be so much greater than paying the bills now. The researchers − from the UK, Switzerland and the US − conclude that policy-makers must apply the …

Epoch-defining study pinpoints when humans came to dominate planet Earth

The human-dominated geological epoch known as the Anthropocene probably began around the year 1610, with an unusual drop in atmospheric carbon dioxide and the irreversible exchange of species between the New and Old Worlds, according to new research published in Nature. Previous epochs began and ended due to factors including meteorite strikes, sustained volcanic eruptions and the shifting of the …

burning earth

Climate Genocide

The planet has warmed by 0.85C since the industrial revolution, or since 1880, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which is the baseline for measurement by the scientific community. That doesn’t seem like much; it’s such a small number, less than one (1). But, remarkably, the increase of 0.85C happened within 150 years, whereas historically it normally …

Trees

Our Planet’s Lungs Are Dying

Trees are like our planet’s lungs. Every second of every day, they’re absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere, and converting it into energy. In fact, according to a study by researchers at NASA, each year, tropical rainforests absorb a staggering 1.4 billion metric tons of CO2 from Earth’s atmosphere. Through the process of photosynthesis, they’re “inhaling” that CO2, and keeping it …