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Leid Stories – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Prophetic Warning About Sellout Leaders, Treacherous Liberals and the Purpose of Voting – 04.05.16

On May 17, 1957, in the burgeoning phase of the modern civil-rights movement, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. addressed a demonstration in Washington, D.C., calling for congressional action on a slate of laws to end racial segregation and assure African Americans equal rights. The Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom drew demonstrators largely from churches, religious groups and people sympathetic to the cause, and was an early indication of the pivotal role King would play in at once galvanizing support and momentum for the movement and challenging the power structure’s resistance to the movement’s demands.

On April 5, 1968, the nation and the world were coping with the full weight of the news that King was assassinated previous night, cut down on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., where he had gone to organize support for African American sanitation workers open strike for equal pay and better working conditions. King was 39 years old.

A decade earlier, in the nation’s capital, King had taken up the mantle and made the clarion call for freedom, justice and equality. He also warned that the protracted struggle would entail battles with sellout leaders, treacherous liberals and the political currency of the hard-won right to vote.

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Inspired by US, Israel Moves Toward Legalizing Torture of Palestinian Prisoners – Sarah Lazare

The Israeli cabinet over the weekend passed a controversial bill that approves the force-feeding of hunger striking prisoners—an act that is widely considered torture, including by the Israeli Medical Association. The move means that the bill can now be sent to Israel’s parliament, the Knesset, for its second and third readings. However, Dr. Leonid Eidelman who leads the Israeli Medical Association reportedly told Haaretz, “If …

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Paul Craig Roberts – The Power of Lies

It is one of history’s ironies that the Lincoln Memorial is a sacred space for the Civil Rights Movement and the site of Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Lincoln did not think blacks were the equals of whites. Lincoln’s plan was to send the blacks in America back to Africa, and if he had not been assassinated, …

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Leid Stories – 03.03.15

Toil and Trouble: Black Labor from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement (Part 4)

Our guest, Professor Charles L. Lumpkins, concludes his presentation on African American labor from the Civil War to the turn of the 21st century—covering the periods of chattel slavery, Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, and the Progressive Era.