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iEat Green – Sally Edwards- Chemical Footprint Project – 11.03.16

Dr. Sally Edwards has many years of experience in engaging a wide range of stakeholders to promote the environmental health of communities and develop safer and greener products. She is a senior research associate at the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. She is a co- founder of the Chemical Footprint Project, which is designed to recognize corporate leadership in the use of safer chemicals. Sally facilitates the work of the Green Chemistry and Commerce Council’s Retailer Leadership Council, whose mission is to promote safer chemicals, materials and products across retail supply chains. Eight major retailers are active participants in the RLC. Sally also serves on the board of directors for Women’s Voices for the Earth. Sally holds a MS in Environmental Health Science from Harvard University and a BA in Human Biology from Stanford University. She completed her doctorate in Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. Her book, Beyond Child’s Play: Sustainable Product Design in the Global Doll-Making Industry, was published in 2009.

The Hidden Toxins In Your Clothing By Dr. Edward F. Group III

Popular clothing stores, like H&M, Levi’s, and Gap, are beginning to turn their attention toward producing healthier and more environmentally-friendly clothing. [1] Increased consumer awareness around the dangers of synthetic dyes, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and phthalates in conventional clothing is fueling a drastic revolution in the fashion industry. Keeping in line with current trends, clothing retailers are finally attempting to appeal to health-conscious buyers …

Who’s Really Paying for Our Cheap Clothes? – Lorraine Chow

Can the fast fashion industry ever truly be sustainable? Earlier this month, H&M released its 110-page Conscious Action Sustainability Report, its 13th annual review of its green practices and efforts towards fair wages within its factories. Although many of its figures and initiatives are commendable (e.g. its in-store recycling program brought in around 13,000 tons of clothing; it aims to use 80 percent renewable electricity …