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The Infectious Myth – Nancy Banks on “The Slow Death of the AIDS/Cancer Paradigm – 12.26.17

In episode 168 David talks with Nancy Banks, a Harvard Medical School trained MD, about her new book, “The Slow Death of the AIDS/Cancer Paradigm”. She believes that approaches to cancer, and the entire HIV=AIDS=Death dogma are based on a flawed understanding of eukaryotic cell metabolism, eukaryotic referring to all cells with a membrane enclosed nucleus, as in all higher …

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Laurie Levy – The Cruel and Pointless Push to Get Preschoolers ‘College and Career Ready’

In case you missed it, April 21 was officially Kindergarten Day. This obscure holiday honors the birth of Friedrich Frobel, who started the first Children’s Garden in Germany in 1837. Of course, life has changed tremendously in the 179 years since Frobel created his play-based, socialization program to transition young children from home to school — and so, too, has …

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Darby Saxbe – This Is Your Brain On Poverty

This guest post was written by Suzanne Houston, a doctoral candidate in developmental psychology at USC who uses neuroimaging techniques to study brain development in children and adolescents. All of you reading this sentence have been adolescents at one point.  You have experienced the years marked by self-consciousness and peer pressure; when your parents were too strict, and your teachers too annoying.  …

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New University of Alberta study challenges ‘mid-life crisis’ theory

Jan. 11, 2015 – For half a century, the accepted research on happiness has shown our lives on a U-shaped curve, punctuated by a low point that we’ve come to know as the “mid-life crisis”. A number of studies have claimed over the years that happiness declines for most from the early 20s to middle age (40 to 60). Today, …

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David Suzuki – Healing humanity’s grief in the face of climate change

The tragedy we’re witnessing in so many places around the world is heartbreaking. Responses on the ground and in the media to events in Paris, Beirut, Syria, and elsewhere have ranged from inspiring to chilling. Too often, people express fear and distress as anger, suspicion, and scapegoating.   For many reasons and in many ways, people and nature are in distress. …

People who follow their instincts might be more trustworthy

Sarah Ward, psychology doctoral candidate at the University of Missouri, conducted a two-pronged study investigating how people who follow their instincts behave in morally charged situations. Acting on instinct, as an area of psychological research, has seen relatively little study. This is partly due to its nebulous nature and the difficulty of pinning down “gut feelings” in an experimental setting. …

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Fracking chemicals tied to reduced sperm count in mice

Washington, DC–Prenatal exposure to a mixture of chemicals used in the oil and natural gas drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, at levels found in the environment lowered sperm counts in male mice when they reached adulthood, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s journal Endocrinology. The scientists tested 24 chemicals used in fracking and determined …

Impact of insecticides on the cognitive development of 6-year-old children BY RALPH TURCHIANO

In an article published in the journal Environment International, researchers from Inserm (Inserm Unit 1085 – IRSET, the Institute of Research in Environmental and Occupational Health, Rennes), in association with the Laboratory for Developmental and Educational Psychology, LPDE (Rennes 2 University), provide new evidence of neurotoxicity in humans from pyrethroid insecticides, which are found in a wide variety of products and …