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Glen Ford – The Clintons: “We Came, We Stole, Haitians Died”

“The discrediting of the elections would also reflect very badly on presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.” The island nation of Haiti is on the verge of finally ejecting the criminal President Michel “Sweet Mickey” Martelly, the dance hall performer and gangster who was foisted on the Haitian people by the United States through the bullying of then Secretary of State Hillary …

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Leid Stories – 01.07.16

The World in Transition: 2015-2016 with Dr. Gerald Horne
Dr. Gerald Horne, the John J. and Rebecca Moores chair of history and African American studies at the University of Houston and frequent analyst of world affairs on Leid Stories, discusses trends, developments and issues that were significant in 2015 and will continue to be so in the new year.

The author of more than 30 books, Dr. Horne most recently published Confronting Black Jacobins: The United States, the Haitian Revolution and the Origins of the Dominican Republic.

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Nixon Boumba – The Struggle for Land Justice Knows No Borders: Corporate Pillaging in Haiti

The January 2010 earthquake provided a perfect opportunity for many to come and do business in Haiti. Even prior to the earthquake [4], Bill Clinton led the discussion on developing Haiti through corporate investment. President Martelly turned that approach into a credo: “Haiti is open for business [5].” We understand the pretext for this so-called development. The concept of extraction isn’t very …

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Julia Marsh – Moms sue NYC over mandatory flu vaccinations

Using a similar argument to the one that helped defeat former Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s soda ban, five Manhattan and Brooklyn mothers with children in preschool are suing the city over its policy of mandatory flu vaccinations. The parents — ranging from a single mom in an East Harlem housing project to an investment banker in the Flatiron District — claim …

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Black Agenda Radio – 11.09.15

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective.

– A conference on the Black radical tradition is scheduled for January 8th through 10th at Philadelphia’s Temple University. Dr. Anthony Monteiro, who was until recently a professor of African American Studies at Temple, is one of the conference organizers. Dr. Monteiro says it’s time for the Black liberation movement to get focused.

– Dr. Gerald Horne, the professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston, is one of the most prolific Black scholars of modern times. Much of his recent work has focused on the origins of the United States as a bulwark of slavery and racist reaction. Dr. Horne’s news book is titled, “Confronting Black Jacobins: The U.S., the Haitian Revolution, and the Origins of the Dominican Republic.” Horne sees his book as an update on the late, great C.L.R. James’s 1938 classic, “The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution.”

– Two Black farmers organizations, one in the U.S. Deep South, the other in Central America, have been awarded the 2015 Food Sovereignty Prize. But, what is food sovereignty? We asked Beverly Bell, coordinator of Other Worlds and an associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, in Washington.

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Leid Stories – 11.02.15

Widespread Uncertainty About Fairness of Elections in Haiti

A 42-Year War for Freedom the U.S. Would Rather Forget

Kim Ives, a co-founder and editor of the international weekly newspaper Haïti Liberté, and an award-winning filmmaker and documentarian, reports on two key stories we’ve been discussing on Leid Stories—Haiti’s Oct. 25 elections and the deportation of Haitians from the Dominican Republic under a controversial race-specific law.
One hundred and eighty years ago today, bands of First Nations warriors and Africans who had freed themselves from slavery engaged U.S. soldiers in Florida in defense of their land and their freedom. Lasting for seven years, from 1835 to 1842, it was the second time, between 1816 and 1858, that U.S. forces would meet combined military resistance.
Historian Jan Carew brings to light this neglected chapter of U.S. history, erroneously recorded as the Seminole Wars.

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Black Agenda Radio – 11.02.15

Welcome, to the radio magazine that brings you news, commentary and analysis from a Black Left perspective.

– Outrage continues to build Richland County, South Carolina, where a white policeman was caught on video manhandling a Black female high school student. Efia Wangaza is a people’s lawyer and director of the Malcolm X Center for Self-Determination, in Greenville, South Carolina. She’s part of a coalition of citizens and parents that have launched a series of actions against in-school violence, especially against Black girls.

– The school-to-prison pipeline starts before Black and brown students even set foot in kindergarten, according to a new study by the Center for American Progress and the National Black Child Development Institute. Researcher Maryam Adamu says the study shows that lasting harm is inflicted on Black and brown children in pre-school, where they suffer disproportionate suspensions and expulsions.

– Activists in Newark, New Jersey, turned out for a forum organized to prepare for the installation of a new Civilian Complaint Review Board, appointed by Mayor Ras Baraka. The Black-led People’s Organization for Progress , P.O.P, will be represented on the board, along with other community groups. Larry Adams is vice-chairman of POP. He says the Review Board MUST the power to subpoena witnesses and police records.

– The nation Haiti held a second round of elections on October 25th, this time for president. Back in August, legislative elections were marred by massive voter suppression by allies of the current government. The Boston-based Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti set up a hot-line to report irregularities in both elections. The first tallies from October’s presidential ballots should be released, later this week. But, Institute director Brian Concannon says the U.S.-backed Haitian regime has tampered with that election, too.

– The Haiti Action Committee, based in the San Fransisco Bay Area, was part of a human rights and labor fact-finding delegation to the island nation. Haiti Action’s Pierre Labossiere and his colleagues believe the turnout of voters was NOT low, but that the vote was suppressed by the ruling party. He disputes that only 20 to 30 percent of Haitians attempted to vote.

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Energy Stew – We know life is improving in many ways yet we see so many destructive tendencies in our society – 09.11.15

My guest this week is Steve McIntosh, an important evolutionary writer whose new book, “The Presence of the Infinite”, offers new insights to bring more people on board in the quest for Beauty, Truth and Goodness.

He believes we’re all following spiritual paths, even those who don’t believe in spirit. Also science understands there are deeper realities we need to respect. He feels that these on profound levels we can more readily embrace an evolutionary drive in the pursuit of Beauty, Truth and Goodness.

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Expat Files – 08.21.15

-In Latin America, when socialist paradise policies go awry and the natives get restless, massive crowds often take to the streets. Then, the first thing the “peoples” government does is impose currency controls, censorship and restrictions on basic rights. Sound familiar?

-Some Latin crime statistics regarding organized big city gangs: Is crime out of control? How does such criminality affect Expats living south of the border?

-Did you know that Uruguay has five times the number of military personal per capita than the average Latin country, and that the US government gives millions each year specifically to support that effort? Which begs the question, what terrible enemies does little Uruguay have? Might Argentina, Chile or Peru be poised to invade? By the way, nearly one in of five Uruguay workers has a government job- a lopsided effect that’s about three times the Latin American average. Only Cuba has a larger percentage of government workers per capita.

-Today, first-world gringa expats in Latin America have some tips and generalities concerning dating and relationships with Latin guys. You’ll be surprised (or maybe not).