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Leid Stories – Election 2016: What We Should Have Learned By Now – 05.18.16

As Election 2016 progresses toward various parties’ nominating conventions this summer, (for Republicans, July 18-21 in Cleveland, Ohio; for Democrats, July 25-28 in Philadelphia, Pa.; the Green Party, Aug. 4-7 in Houston, Texas; the Libertarian Party, May 27-30 in Orlando, Fla.), presidential hopefuls are in the final stretch of the primaries, looking to claim their spots as their parties’ standard bearers in the general election. The duopoly has outdone all other major parties in the still-ongoing battle of attrition. Donald Trump is the last person standing in the Republican field of 17; Hillary Clinton is being touted as the presumptive Democratic nominee.

By all indications, Election 2016 will be a watershed moment in U.S. electoral politics—though for reasons that should alarm even a casual observer. Leid Stories has been looking at this historical moment in terms of what politics and the political process have come to mean and be for the masses of people. We continue this discussion, focusing on what we are learning, or have learned, about our relationship to the political apparatus, and ways in which we can affect political outcomes through an increased consciousness and strategic use of power.

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Leid Stories – Election 2016: Ahead of Primary, All Presidential Candidates Are In A New York Frame of Mind – 04.14.16

Going into the high-stakes, delegate-rich April 19 New York primary, presidential hopefuls are leaving nothing to chance. They’re all over the Empire State, working their circuits and trolling for votes. A hurriedly arranged CNN “debate” between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders tonight in Brooklyn is trumping (pardon the pun) all other events the Democratic candidates have scheduled. On the Republican side, Donald Trump is making the most of his hometown brand.

Leid Stories discusses the importance of the New York primary, especially to those who reject duopoly politics.

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Leid Stories – Election 2016’s Most Outstanding Feature: The Rise of the Kakistocrats – 03.30.16

No matter how things turn out, Election 2016 will be remembered as a defining moment in U.S. history. For, this is the year of The Kakistocrats. Leid Stories discusses the imminent reality of government by the worst. Watch the clip Utrice played on air today inside the link.

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Leid Stories – Election 2016: Super Tuesday to Further Narrow Both Field and Focus – 03.15.16

It’s Super Tuesday (the third for this election cycle), and Democratic and Republican presidential candidates are in make-or-break primaries in delegate-rich Florida, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri and North Carolina. Results by the end of the day more than likely will cause a whittling of the GOP’s four-man slate, and on the Democratic side, a locked lead on being the nominee. Leid Stories continues yesterday’s discussion on what this all means to and for the rest of us.

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Leid Stories – Election 2016: A Merciful End to ‘Debates,’ But Not to Party Politricks – 03.10.16

Election 2016: A Merciful End to ‘Debates,’ But Not to Party Politricks

A contentious Clinton-Sanders square off in Miami last night, their fourth match up as the remaining Democratic presidential candidates, brought to a close the televised Q&A sessions the party scheduled. A four-way bruiser among the Republican candidates still standing—Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and John Kasich—takes place tonight, also in Miami, and will be the party’s 12th and final “debate” for the primary season.

How have these events, the primaries held thus far, and the candidates themselves shaped our opinions about the political process, the 2016 presidential election, the direction of the country, and individual choices and actions? Listeners offer their views.

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Leid Stories – 03.08.16

Election 2016: The Duopoly’s Self-Inflicted Wounds Are A Timely Gift

The 2016 presidential primaries continue apace, with contests in Hawaii, Idaho, Michigan and Mississippi today that will put Democratic and Republican frontrunners even closer to their goal of winning nomination. But there’s trouble—big trouble—in both camps that largely are self-inflicted wounds and the consequences of a fundamentally undemocratic process. The duopoly’s crisis is a gift we’ve been waiting for, says Leid Stories, and we should make the most of it.