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Life Without Bees: The Effects on Food

Due to climate change, the increased use of pesticides and a range of other causal factors, bee populations have decreased steadily over the past years. This could result in a huge impact on our food supply and indeed, our health. As a matter of fact, one in every three bites of food consumed around the world depends on pollinators, bees …

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Andrea Germanos – EPA Acknowledges Neonics’ Harm to Bees, Then ‘Bows to Pesticide Industry’

The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday published two bee-related announcements, but with both, say environmental groups, the agency has failed the pollinators. One was its “Policy to Mitigate the Acute Risk to Bees from Pesticide Products.” It states that the “policy is not a regulation or an order and, therefore, does not legally compel changes to pesticide product registrations.” The …

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MARGARET ROACH – 5 Ways To Make Your Garden More Bee-Friendly

Bees are struggling for survival, so I try to do my part to help. First order of business: Provide water and never use chemicals. This year, I’ll also bolster plantings to add early- and late-season bloom periods. Bees rely on nectar and pollen for fuel, so from spring’s first pussy willows to the last-gasp asters in late fall, I’ll offer …

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Lorraine Chow – 97% of Endangered Species Threatened by 3 Common Pesticides

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has released its first-ever analysis on the effects of three common pesticides—chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion—on endangered and threatened species and designated critical habitat nationwide. The resounding conclusion? Pesticides are terrible for them. According to the report, malathion and chlorpyrifos harms an astounding 97 percent of the 1,782 animals and plants protected under the Endangered Species Act. Diazinon harms 79 percent. Malathion is often used on fruit, vegetables …

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Near extinction possible for monarch butterflies

A new study (abstract below) has found that the monarch butterfly population in the US has “a substantial probability of quasi-extinction, from 11–57% over 20 years”. The study repeats the well-documented fact that a major factor in the decline of the monarch is the adoption of herbicide-tolerant GM corn and soybeans. The herbicide spraying has killed off the monarch larvae’s only food, …

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Dan Bacher – California Fish Species Plummet To Record Lows

Fish species ranging from endangered Delta Smelt to Striped Bass continued to plummet to record low population levels in 2015 in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, according to the annual fall survey report released on December 18by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). Only 6 Delta Smelt, an endangered species that once numbered in the millions and was …

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From Seabirds to Starfish: Climate Change Driving Unprecedented Die-Offs

From seabirds to whales to antelopes to starfish, animal die-offs across the globe are raising alarm about the deadly impact of climate change on the world’s ecosystems and their vulnerable inhabitants. An estimated 8,000 black-and-white common murres were found dead on the beaches of Alaska’s Prince William Sound over the weekend, joining thousands more that have washed up on beaches …

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Resistance Radio – Gerardo Ceballos – 11.08.15

Dr Gerardo Ceballos is one of the world’s leading ecologists, and is a professor at the Institute of Ecology at National Autonomous University of Mexico. He is the author of numerous books, including The Skin of the Rainforest, Mammals of Mexico, and The Annihilation of Nature: Human Extinction of Birds and Mammals. He is also known for his fieldwork on prairie dogs, jaguars, and others. He proposed the first Mexican endangered species act, that includes roughly 4000 species of plants and animals in the country. He has seen through to establishment more than 20 protected areas that cover almost 2% of the Mexican land territory and protect thousands of plants and animals, including around 15% of all endangered species. No other Mexican scientist – perhaps no other individual scientist in the world — has accomplished so much in hands-on conservation. Today we talk about prairie dogs as a keystone species.

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Resistance Radio – Noah Greenwald – 09.27.15

Noah Greenwald is the Endangered Species Director for the Center for Biological Diversity. He directs the Center’s efforts to protect new species under the Endangered Species Act, to ensure that imperiled species receive effective protections and that we have the strongest Endangered Species Act possible. He also works to educate the public about the importance of protecting biodiversity and about the multitude of threats to the survival of North American wildlife. He holds a bachelor of science in ecology from the Evergreen State College and a master’s in forest ecology and conservation from the University of Washington. Before he joined the Center in 1997, Noah worked as a field biologist, surveying northern spotted owls and marbled murrelets and banding Hawaiian songbirds. Today we talk about grizzly bears.

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Resistance Radio – Diana Beresford-Kroeger – 09.13.15

Diana Beresford-Kroeger, a botanist, medical biochemist and self-defined “renegade scientist,” brings together ethnobotany, horticulture, spirituality and alternative medicine to reveal a path toward better stewardship of the natural world. Diana’s latest book is called The Sweetness of a Simple Life (Random House Canada). Recently, Diana has been working on a film based on her book, The Global Forest, which has taken her around the globe. The film will be released in 2015. Diana lives in Ontario, Canada, with her husband, Christian H. Kroeger, surrounded by her research garden filled with rare and endangered species.