13

The Gary Null Show – 05.10.16

On “The Gary Null Show” today, Gary does a quick Health and Healing block, which you can read by clicking on the links and then discusses “What it is to be a Progressive?” Listen and read and get a better understand of the world we live in:

Bad carbs increase risk of cancer by up to 88 percent

Get rid of a poison oak rash

Could lime juice save hundreds of thousands of lives annually?

Grapes protect against ultraviolet radiation

Why are fish suddenly dying by the millions?

Gary takes a quick music break and plays this great song: Earth, Wind & Fire – Fantasy. Gary returned to discuss “What it means to be a Reagan conservative ?” and “What is a Progressive?” Gary gives his own voice to the topic and below are a few reference articles to let you understand more:

This is the video Gary was discussing about Bill O’Reilly saying Obama is a Progressive:

VIDEO: Justice, Obama and Trump

The 11 principles of a Reagan conservative or

11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative

Sadistic capitalism: Six urgent matters for humanity in global crisis
62 people own the same as half the world

Reform Is Not Enough to Stem the Rising Tide of Inequality Worldwide

IMG_5935

iEat Green – Tamar Haspel – 04.14.16

Tamar Haspel is a journalist who’s been on the food and science beat for the best part of two decades. She writes a monthly Washington Post column, Unearthed, which covers food supply issues: biotech, pesticides, food additives, antibiotics, organics, nutrition, and food policy. The column has earned a James Beard award nomination each of its two years, winning in 2015, and one of her columns was selected for Best Food Writing 2015. Haspel is knee-deep in the public food conversation, and speaks frequently at venues where the debates about our food supply play out, including the National Academy of Sciences, food- and ag-related conferences, and SXSW.

When she’s tired of the heavy lifting of journalism, she gets dirty. She and her husband, Kevin Flaherty, raise their own chickens, catch their own fish, grow their own tomatoes, hunt their own venison, and generally try to stay connected to the idea that food has to come from somewhere. They also have an oyster farm, Barnstable Oyster, where they grown about 50,000 oysters a year in the beautiful waters off Cape Cod. Haspel revels in the idea that New York diners pay $3. a pop for their product, and she can eat as many as she wants.

1

Warrior Connection – 08.23.15

Warrior Connection was a continuing discussion on PTSD and avoiding the hooks.

HOOKS

Substance abuse is a constant danger to those who are living with PTSD.
Because we are always looking for something to help us forget or make us feel better, we become prone to addiction. We can avoid substance abuse if we will make a conscience decision to begin making better choices.
This program will help you to better understand addiction.

“Watch out for the Hooks” is an object lesson designed for youth (6 and older) to help them identify and avoid destructive addictions in America today. I have been demonstrating this unique object lesson (based on fishing) to young people and adults alike for the past twelve years. It has proven to be a great source of information on how to avoid being ensnared by attractive “lures” that will rob them of having a happy and fulfilled life.

This is a “must see” demonstration that will empower young people to detect and avoid the many “lures” that the commercial world will inevitably put in front of them. They will learn through a simple fishing lesson the snares and dangers of playing with “HOOKS.”
This object lesson has been presented to many Church groups, Private and Public school classes, Martial Arts Training Halls and Tournament events, Craven County Detention Center, Pitt County Adult & Juvenile Detention Centers along with Prime For Life substance abuse and prevention classes at MCAS Cherry Point, N.C.

This program of Help and Hope was created to keep our children and young adults clean and free from destructive addictions. Please call for more information or a demonstration.

Ray Clark
“The Never Ending War” (L M Clark)HOOKS

Substance abuse is a constant danger to those who are living with PTSD.
Because we are always looking for something to help us forget or make us feel better, we become prone to addiction. We can avoid substance abuse if we will make a conscience decision to begin making better choices.
This program will help you to better understand addiction.

“Watch out for the Hooks” is an object lesson designed for youth (6 and older) to help them identify and avoid destructive addictions in America today. I have been demonstrating this unique object lesson (based on fishing) to young people and adults alike for the past twelve years. It has proven to be a great source of information on how to avoid being ensnared by attractive “lures” that will rob them of having a happy and fulfilled life.

This is a “must see” demonstration that will empower young people to detect and avoid the many “lures” that the commercial world will inevitably put in front of them. They will learn through a simple fishing lesson the snares and dangers of playing with “HOOKS.”
This object lesson has been presented to many Church groups, Private and Public school classes, Martial Arts Training Halls and Tournament events, Craven County Detention Center, Pitt County Adult & Juvenile Detention Centers along with Prime For Life substance abuse and prevention classes at MCAS Cherry Point, N.C.

This program of Help and Hope was created to keep our children and young adults clean and free from destructive addictions. Please call for more information or a demonstration.

Ray Clark
“The Never Ending War” (L M Clark)

www.neverendingwar.com

Climate change may knock seafood off the menu By Tim Radford

Pink salmon – the smallest and most abundant of the Pacific salmon species, and a supper table mainstay in many parts of the world – may be swimming towards trouble. And they are not the only dish likely to disappear from the menu. Mussels, oysters, clam and scallop could all become scarcer and more expensive as the seas become more …