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Demand for coffee can create ecological, economic rift with poorer nations

The explosion in worldwide coffee consumption in the past two decades has generally not benefitted farmers of coffee beans in poorer nations along the equator. A University of Kansas (KU) researcher studying trade and globalization has found that the shift to “technified” coffee production in the 1970s and 1980s has created harsher economic and ecological consequences for heavy coffee-producing nations, …

Honduras Bleeding by ERIC DRAITSER and RAMIRO S. FUNEZ

June 28 marked the six year anniversary of the military coup in Honduras – the day that a democratically elected left wing government was ousted by a US-backed, US-trained cabal of generals and right wing politicians and landowners. It could correctly be called a “Quiet Coup” primarily because it took place with very little fanfare from the corporate media which, to …

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At Behest of IMF, Jamaicans Face Harshest Austerity Policies in World: Report

Thanks to policies imposed by the International Monetary Fund and embraced by the domestic government, the Caribbean nation of Jamaica—saddled with poverty and international debt—has the most severe austerity budget on the planet, a new report from the U.S.-based Center for Economic and Policy Research reveals. Entitled Partners in Austerity: Jamaica, the United States and the International Monetary Fund, the paper …

Civil Society Denounces World Bank’s Conference on Land & Poverty

Oakland, CA — Every spring for the last fifteen years, the World Bank has organized the “Conference on Land and Poverty,” which brings together corporations, governments and civil society groups. The aim is ostensibly to discuss how to “improve land governance.” Whereas the 16th conference will take place in Washington D.C. from March 23 to 27, hundreds of civil society organizations are …

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My libertarian vacation nightmare: How Ayn Rand, Ron Paul & their groupies were all debunked

Last month, I spent my final vacation night in Honduras in San Pedro Sula, considered the most dangerous city outside of the war-torn Middle East. I would not have been scared, except that I traveled with my wife and our four children, aged 5, 7, 14 and 18.   On our last taxi ride, we could not find a van to fit us …