1

iEat Green – Executive Director of Hunger Action Network Susan Zimet – 02.23.17

Susan Zimet has been the Executive Director of Hunger Action Network of New York State since February, 2015. Hunger Action Network is a membership organization of emergency food providers, advocates, faith groups and low-income individuals whose goal is to end hunger and its root causes, including poverty. Hunger Action Network has the dual goals of reducing hunger in the short term (e.g., increase funding for emergency food, stronger food stamp programs, more community gardens) while promoting long-term solutions such as universal health care, living wage jobs, and affordable housing. Susan has a long career in government and in media relations and marketing. She has dedicated herself to advocating on public policy issues such as property tax reform, protecting the environment, women’s rights and veteran’s rights. Prior to joining Hunger Action Network, Susan served as an elected official, representing the Town of New Paltz in both the Ulster County Legislature and as the Town Supervisor. She also served as Vice President, Associate Media Director at Grey Advertising and taught advertising and media at SUNY New Paltz. In addition to Hunger Action Network, Susan is also President of Zimet Group, Inc., a consulting and lobbying group, dedicated to bringing business and government together for the public good. Working in cooperation with many environmental partners, Susan was instrumental in helping to push through the historic moratorium in NYS on Fracking, back in 2007. The Zimet Group executive produced media campaigns against hydro-fracking, including; ‘I Love My New York Water” celebrity commercial, as well as “Water Rangers”. Susan is also the President of ‘Votes For Women 2020’, a not for profit dedicated to educating, celebrating and promoting the upcoming 100 th anniversary of a women’s right to vote. Susan has authored a book for young adults on the subject, which is scheduled to come out this year.

1

The Space-Saving, ‘Upside-Down Way’ To Grow Indoor Tomatoes This Winter

Indoor gardening can be a great way to have fresh vegetables year-round and satisfy your green thumb during the winter, but if you live in a small home or apartment, it can be challenging to find enough room for your plants. One solution is to turn your indoor garden on its head – literally. Many vegetable plants that do well …

1

Hannah Devlin – cMigraines could be caused by gut bacteria, study suggests

Migraine sufferers have a different mix of gut bacteria that could make them more sensitive to certain foods, scientists have found. The study offers a potential explanation for why some people are more susceptible to debilitating headaches and why some foods appear to act as triggers for migraines. The research showed that migraine sufferers had higher levels of bacteria that …

1

Magnesium L-Threonate Boosts Memory

Magnesium L-threonate is a new form of magnesium that has recently gained attention for its range of associated brain health benefits. The compound is produced by joining magnesium with L-threonic acid, a sugar derived from a vitamin C metabolite. Threonate is a vitamin C metabolite that acts as a carrier to help magnesium enter the brain. Other forms like magnesium chloride, …

1

Big Food Once Again Tries to Muscle in on Kids’ School Lunch Trays

A 2002 federal program that delivers fresh fruits and vegetables to the country’s poorest schools is now at risk because of crony capitalism. Lobbyists from the frozen, fried, canned, and dried food industries are all jostling to have their products included in the government program, and their efforts are paying off. Reps. Bruce Poliquin (R-ME) and Kurt Schrader (D-OR) have recently …

leafy-greens

Eat Leafy Greens for a Sharper Brain – Traci Pedersen

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” —Hippocrates A new study has found that eating leafy green vegetables – such as spinach, kale and mustard greens – can have a dramatically positive effect on our thinking abilities. In fact, older people who eat one to two servings a day of leafy greens have the cognitive skills of …

leafy-greens

Lots of leafy greens might shield aging brains, study finds

Researchers evaluated the eating habits and mental ability of more than 950 older adults for an average of five years. Those who consumed one or two servings of foods such as spinach, kale, mustard greens and/or collards daily experienced slower mental deterioration than those who ate no leafy greens at all, the study found. The brain benefits associated with dark leafy greens …

food garden

4 Important Tips for Growing Your Own Superfoods

For those who bother to grow their own food – a ‘radical’ act that has almost become necessary due to the GMO-laden land around us – the idea of consuming boosted plant nutrients is wildly appealing. Growing specific varieties of vegetables and fruits which are rich in phytonutrients, including anthocyanins, quercetin, lutein, and lycopene, for example, can help to prevent cancer, help …