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Moving Forward – 07.17.17

Rob Seimetz and Bruce Wright our joined by Linh Dinh. Today we discuss America’s war on the poor and homeless, as well as, the End of America. Linh Dinh is the author of Postcards from the End of America and nine other books. His political essays are published regularly at Unz Review and other webzines.  His website is linhdinhphotos.blogspot.com. Download this episode (right …

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This Melting Glacier in Antarctica Could Raise Sea Levels By 11 Feet

The Earth’s climate, it seems, isn’t listening to the politicians that are insisting it’s not warming. The temperature continues to rise incrementally, and the globe’s large glaciers—giant vaults of stored water—continue to melt, releasing into the oceans. The global sea level, due to thermal expansion and glacial melting, continues to rise, building up a head of steam like a train …

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APRIL McCARTHY – In 2017, More Antibiotics Will Be Consumed By Farm Animals Than Humans

Governments around the world consider antimicrobial-resistant bacteria a major and growing threat to public health. In 2017, many more people could begin dying from common bacterial infections as resistance to antibiotics booms. Diseases are becoming untreatable — a situation that looks set to get worse as the world reaches a new tipping point next year. Read more

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Nicholas Conley – Why the US Should Have Universal Healthcare

In the United States, healthcare has been one of the biggest political battles of the decade. As a healthcare worker myself, it’s an issue that strikes close to home. My years of experience caring for people with dementia, traumatic brain injuries, tetraplegia, cancer, and more has given me a firsthand look into what our healthcare system is like at the …

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Here’s when powerful people have trouble making a decision

Although powerful people often tend to decide and act quickly, they become more indecisive than others when the decisions are toughest to make, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when people who feel powerful also feel ambivalent about a decision – torn between two equally good or bad choices – they actually have a harder time taking action than …

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Greenland ice is melting seven percent faster than previously thought

The same hotspot in Earth’s mantle that feeds Iceland’s active volcanoes has been playing a trick on the scientists who are trying to measure how much ice is melting on nearby Greenland. According to a new study in the journal Science Advances, the hotspot softened the mantle rock beneath Greenland in a way that ultimately distorted their calculations for ice loss …

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Pam Frost Gorder – New genus of bacteria found living inside hydraulic fracturing wells

Researchers analyzing the genomes of microorganisms living in shale oil and gas wells have found evidence of sustainable ecosystems taking hold there—populated in part by a never-before-seen genus of bacteria they have dubbed “Frackibacter.” The new genus is one of the 31 microbial members found living inside two separate fracturing wells, Ohio State University researchers and their colleagues report in …

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The Dr. Peter Breggin Hour – 07.27.16

Dr. Michael Corrigan, my friend and a professor at the Ohio State University is an outstanding scientist in the field of assessment and evaluation of children’s services and, at the same time, a tremendous advocate for children and critic of the medical approach to their problems.   He’s a leader in the field worth listening to.  Download this episode (right click …

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Amanda LeClaire – U-M Researchers: Low Income And Minority Communities Are Targets For Hazardous Waste Industries

University of Michigan researchers say low income and minority communities are targeted as sites for hazardous waste facilities. Using U.S. Census data, researchers found a pattern of hazardous waste sites being built near poor and minority communities. U-M’s Environmental Studies Professor Paul Mohai explains that this study clears up the question of whether toxic waste facilities cause demographic changes or …

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Social networks as important as exercise and diet across the span of our lives

The more social ties people have at an early age, the better their health is at the beginnings and ends of their lives, a new study suggests. Researchers say the study is the first to definitively link social relationships with concrete measures of physical well-being such as abdominal obesity, inflammation, and high blood pressure, all of which are associated with …