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Leid Stories—It’s ‘Free Your Mind Friday!’ Let’s Hear What You Have to Say!—12.02.16

It’s our weekly open forum, “Free Your Mind Friday,” on Leid Stories, and you’re invited to share your astute observations and analysis of the issues and events that shaped the week, or on any subject you consider worthy of further discussion or debate.

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Being fit protects against health risks caused by stress at work

It is a well-known fact that fitness and well-being go hand in hand. But being in good shape also protects against the health problems that arise when we feel particularly stressed at work. As reported by sports scientists from the University of Basel and colleagues from Sweden, it therefore pays to stay physically active, especially during periods of high stress. …

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Need to remember something? Exercise four hours later

Here’s a possible strategy to boost memory—exercise four hours after you learn something. In a study published in the July 11, 2016, Current Biology, researchers found that exercise after learning may improve your memory of the new information, but only if done in a specific time window. In the study, 72 subjects learned 90 picture-location associations—mentally linking an image with …

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Angela Hui – Foodie with Eating Disorder Stuck Between Passion and Pathology

Earlier this year, Refinery29 published an article about the curious paradox of being a foodie recovering from an eating disorder. The author’s hesitant conclusion was that an epicurean tongue may be impeding her efforts to regain her health, but do eating disorder recovery and a deep love for food need to be mutually exclusive? In tenth grade, I was obsessed …

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The Infectious Myth – Dr. Joel Wallach on Nutrition – 10.04.16

Dr. Joel Wallach learned about the importance of good nutrition while a veterinarian. He applied this knowledge to humans and now runs a company that sells a supplement that contains 91 minerals, amino acids and other types of nutrients. David accepts that many people on a western diet are nutrient deprived, and that the importance of trace nutrients is often ignored, although it is well documented. During the discussion it becomes obvious that David believes that some of Wallach’s statements are exaggerated, such as that the vast majority of people are gluten intolerant, that there is no value in physical exercise and that dog food is highly nutritious for humans. On the other hand, David has no trouble believing that some people can significantly benefit from supplementation, particularly those injured by vaccines, pharmaceutical drugs, chemical exposures or for numerous other reasons. They also agree that the low fat, high carbohydrate diet is a disaster. We hope you enjoy this vigorous discussion.

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Ask The Blood Detective – Detoxification Deception – The Blood Detective Way! – 10.01.16

Forget what you think you know about detoxification, detox methods and what it all means for your health and longevity. Dr. Wald dismantles the many myths surrounding natural detoxification methods, laying out the truth so that you can stop wasting time and money on worthless detoxification scams – and be able to tell the difference between reasonable and ridiculous. Dr. Wald is perhaps the most credentialed nutritionist on the planet; who better than the Blood Detective to show you how to do a Real Detox! Tune in every Saturday at 1pm or go to: www.IntegratedNutritionNY.com or BloodDetective.com for more! Dr. Wald can be reached at: info@Blooddetective.com or by calling 914-242-8844.

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Poverty and perceived hardship affect cognitive function and may contribute to premature aging, say investigators

A new study finds strong associations between sustained exposure to economic hardship and worse cognitive function in relatively young individuals. Poverty and perceived hardship over decades among relatively young people in the U.S. are strongly associated with worse cognitive function and may be important contributors to premature aging among disadvantaged populations, report investigators in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Rising …