1.pg

DOES TYLENOL MAKE US MISS MISTAKES?

Acetaminophen is an effective painkiller, but it could also be blocking our brain’s ability to detect errors. “Past research tells us physical pain and social rejection share a neural process that we experience as distress, and both have been traced to same part of the brain,” says Dan Randles, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto. Recent research has begun …

1

Meditation and ballet associated with wisdom, study says

Wisdom, traditionally associated with old age, is nonetheless found in people of all ages. So, what makes a person wise? A new study, “The Relationship between Mental and Somatic Practices and Wisdom,” published Feb. 18 in PLOS ONE, confirms an age-old conception that meditation is associated with wisdom. Surprisingly, it also concludes that somatic, or physical, practices such as classical ballet …

1

Cole Mellino – Arctic Warming Produces Mosquito Swarms Large Enough to Kill Baby Caribou

Some Alaskans joke that mosquitoes are “Alaska’s state bird,” but the pesky insects are becoming no joke. Warming Arctic temperatures have caused their numbers to swell immensely in the region in recent years. Lauren Culler has been studying insects in Greenland for the last several years. Culler, a postdoctoral researcher for Dartmouth College’s Institute of Arctic Studies, along with a team of researchers published …

1

Andrea Germanos – Humankind Has Halved the Number of Trees on the Planet

The good news: there are over 3 trillion trees covering the Earth—that’s far higher than the 4 billion estimated just two years ago, a team of international researchers has found. But here’s the bad news: there were far more trees—46 percent more—before human civilization got hold, with an estimated 15 billion trees being lost own each year, with just 5 …

Biodiversity reduces human, wildlife diseases and crop pests

With infectious diseases increasing worldwide, the need to understand how and why disease outbreaks occur is becoming increasingly important. Looking for answers, a team of University of South Florida (USF) biologists and colleagues found broad evidence that supports the controversial ‘dilution effect hypothesis,’ which suggests that biodiversity limits outbreaks of disease among humans and wildlife. The paper describing their research …