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T. Colin Campbell – Nutrition, Politics, and the Destruction of Scientific Integrity

On August 1, it will be 60 years since I came to Cornell University to do graduate studies in nutritional biochemistry on the topic of food and health. What a journey this became! In my early days, the focus on good nutrition emphasized the consumption of protein. So it was with me and my professors. The more protein the better. …

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Officials Declare ‘Eating Healthy’ A “Mental Disorder”

Just another reason for big pharma, to fill us up with prescription pills. In an attempt to curb the mass rush for food change and reform, psychiatry has green lighted a public relations push to spread awareness about their new buzzword “orthorexia nervosa,” defined as “a pathological obsession for biologically pure and healthy nutrition.” In other words, experts are moving toward saying that our …

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What Women Must Know – Understanding How All Forms of Stress Create Chronic Illness and Aging and What to Do About It with Dr. Jeffrey Moss – 11.19.15

Dr. Moss graduated from the University of Michigan Dental School in 1974 and practiced dentistry in Grand Rapids, Michigan up to 1985. Having employed clinical nutrition in his practice for six years, he decided to use this experience and enter the professional supplement industry. For the last 23 years he has operated Moss Nutrition Products, which serves health care professionals with nutritional supplements. Since 2000 he has served as adjunct faculty at the University of Bridgeport Nutrition Institute, starting with the Vitamins and Minerals class and, most recently, adding the Assessment in Nutrition class to his teaching responsibilities. He also co-authored the text, Textbook of Nutritional Medicine with Mel Werbach, M.D. Finally, Dr. Moss was president of the International and American Association of Clinical Nutritionists (IAACN).

Researchers’ discovery may explain difficulty in treating Lyme disease

Northeastern University researchers have found that the bad­terium that causes Lyme dis­ease forms for­mant per­sister cells, which are known to evade antibi­otics. This sig­nif­i­cant finding, they said, could help explain why it’s so dif­fi­cult to treat the infec­tion in some patients. “It hasn’t been entirely clear why it’s dif­fi­cult to treat the pathogen with antibi­otics since there has been no …