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Climate-exodus expected in the Middle East and North Africa

More than 500 million people live in the Middle East and North Africa – a region which is very hot in summer and where climate change is already evident. The number of extremely hot days has doubled since 1970. “In future, the climate in large parts of the Middle East and North Africa could change in such a manner that …

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Giant holes found in Siberia could be signs of a ticking climate ‘time bomb’

When a helicopter pilot spotted the first crater in summer 2014, everyone was baffled. The 100-foot-wide hole appeared on the Yamal Peninsula seemingly out of nowhere, during a tense season of Russian military action in Ukraine and international sanctions. And then more appeared. Lacking a better explanation, aliens and underground missiles were floated as possible theories, according The Washington Post. …

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Jeff Masters & Bob Henson – February Smashes Earth’s All-Time Global Heat Record By A Jaw-Dropping Margin

On Saturday, NASA dropped a bombshell of a climate report. February 2016 has soared past all rivals as the warmest seasonally adjusted month in more than a century of global recordkeeping. NASA’s analysis showed that February ran 1.35°C (2.43°F) above the 1951-1980 global average for the month, as can be seen in the list of monthly anomalies going back to 1880. …

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Clean energy could save hundreds of billions in health costs every year

In Paris late last year, the countries of the world pledged to reduce emissions to keep global warming “well below a 2 degree Celsius” rise in global average temperatures compared with preindustrial levels. As an advanced economy, the U.S. is expected to lead in making the required emissions reductions, which would be roughly 80 percent by midcentury compared with 2005. …

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Lizzie Wade – Climate Change Means One World’s Death and Another’s Birth

A few years ago in a lab in Panama, Klaus Winter tried to conjure the future. A plant physiologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, he planted seedlings of 10 tropical tree species in small, geodesic greenhouses. Some he allowed to grow in the kind of environment they were used to out in the forest, around 79 degrees Fahrenheit. Others, …

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2015 Officially the Hottest Year on Record

The final tally is in: 2015 was the hottest year in recorded history—by a record-breaking margin. On Wednesday, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced the official record for last year’s runaway temperatures, which by NOAA’s calculation hit an average of 58.62 degrees Fahrenheit (14.79 degrees Celsius). That’s 1.62 (F) degrees hotter than any average year in …

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Dahr Jamail – The Melting Arctic’s Dramatic Impact on Global Weather Patterns

Arctic sea ice is melting at a record pace – and every summer looks grimmer. This past summer saw the ice pack at its fourth-lowest level on record, and the overall trend in recent decades suggests this will only continue. “Using satellites, scientists have found that the area of sea ice coverage each September has declined by more than 40 …

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Alex Kirby – Rapid warming brings Arctic changes

Scientists in the US who have been checking on the health of the Arctic over the last year are worried by what they’ve learned: it’s warmer, has less ice, and some of its animals and fish are facing new stresses. And in a surprise finding , which they cannot yet explain, the scientists discovered that green vegetation over much of …

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Climate Change Driving ‘Profound’ Shift in Arctic Ecosystem

NOAA warns Arctic is warming ‘twice as fast as other parts of the planet’ The 2015 report card compiled by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and released Tuesday comes to a disturbing conclusion: record highs in air temperatures, and lows in peak ice, reveal that—for the marine ecosystem—climate change is already “profound.” “Changes in sea ice alone are …

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BRIAN PALMER – THE HOUSE ANTI-SCIENCE COMMITTEE

The House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology wants to know what government scientists say about climate change. Not what they say in public, of course—you don’t need a subpoena to read the many reports the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has published on the pressing problem of global warming. No, the congressional body tasked with overseeing the nation’s …