medical expansion

Medical expansion has led people worldwide to feel less healthy

Across much of the Western world, 25 years of expansion of the medical system has actually led to people feeling less healthy over time, a new study has found. A researcher at The Ohio State University used several large multinational datasets to examine changes in how people rated their health between 1981 and 2007 and compared that to medical expansion …

health-insurance

Consumers getting ‘skinned’ by health insurers

The reason health care costs are so high is because Americans don’t have nearly enough “skin in the game.” That was the phrase that many of my former colleagues in the insurance industry and I began using in the early 2000s as a way to deflect attention away from us. Americans — especially American employers — looked to private insurers …

Netanyahu

Netanyahu Deserves the Israeli People, and They Deserve Him

The first conclusion that arose just minutes after the announcement of the exit polls was particularly discouraging: The nation must be replaced. Not another election for the country’s leadership, but general elections to choose a new Israeli people – immediately. The country urgently needs that. It won’t be able to stand another term for Benjamin Netanyahu, who emerged last night …

vaccination tracking

Adults Targeted as Federal Government Prepares to Track the Unvaccinated

During the National Vaccine Advisory Committee’s (NVAC) February meeting, American adults were put on notice by Big Brother that non-compliance with federal vaccine recommendations will not be tolerated. Public health officials have unveiled a new plan to launch a massive nationwide vaccination promotion campaign involving private business and non-profit organizations to pressure all adults to comply with the adult vaccination …

Tuna

The Can O’ Tuna Argument – Synergistic Toxicity and Vaccine Safety

Certainly if you are on the frontlines of the vaccine debate you’ve heard the argument from pro vaxxers ‘hey well, y’know, a can of tuna has about the same amount of mercury in it that a vaccine does.’ Or about aluminum, ‘a muffin has as much aluminum as a vaccine containing aluminum’. It is a silly argument but it shows …

artic20090406-640

A Melting Arctic and Weird Weather: The Plot Thickens

Everyone loves to talk about the weather, and this winter Mother Nature has served up a feast to chew on. Few parts of the US have been spared her wrath. Severe drought and abnormally warm conditions continue in the west, with the first-ever rain-free January in San Francisco; bitter cold hangs tough over the upper Midwest and Northeast; and New England is …

oil and nuclear

The Middle East oil/nuclear puzzle

US Secretary of State John Kerry may be starting to enjoy the brinkmanship, as he says it’s “unclear” whether the US and Iran would reach a political framework nuclear deal before the end of this month. Loud applause may be heard in corridors ranging from Tel Aviv to Riyadh. As negotiations resume in Lausanne, the fact is a potential nuclear …

tryandstopus

The Permanent Paranoia of Empire

The unmitigated effrontery of the Senate this month is hard to excel, but President Obama is doing his best to do just that. Over the past week the President has issued a couple of indictments from the Oval Office, both of which involve traditional rivals, Venezuela and Iran. Their sin? Thinking for themselves, a rare condition that must be instantly …

Child with tablet

Kids and Screen Time: What Parents Should Know

Children’s use of technology and social media has become a focus for modern-day parents. What is an appropriate amount of screen time and how should it be monitored? How does use of technology impact children? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children and teens generally have no more than one to two hours of screen time – including television, computers, …

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden: 'They're going to  say I aided our enemies' - video interview

US THREATENED GERMANY OVER SNOWDEN, VICE CHANCELLOR SAYS

German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel (above) said this week in Homburg that the U.S. government threatened to cease sharing intelligence with Germany if Berlin offered asylum to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden or otherwise arranged for him to travel to that country. “They told us they would stop notifying us of plots and other intelligence matters,” Gabriel said. The vice chancellor delivered a …