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Dave Johnson – You Knew The TPP Was Bad. But Here’s How It Gets Even Worse

Negotiators are meeting in Atlanta, trying to wrap up the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). It might be wrapped up as soon as Thursday. While the agreement is secret, there are reasons for people to be very, very concerned. Here is a news article that explains why people should be alarmed about this secret “trade” agreement that the giant corporations have come …

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LOA Today – 08.27.15

This week on LOA Today, Uohna tells us about a Buddhist monk who has mastered the art of being happy every conscious moment of every day of his life. He even volunteered for 3 hours inside an MRI unit to help a Western medical researcher learn more about how his brain works. Most people start to freak out in an MRI machine after a half hour. Three hours later, he emerged happy and content. Is he crazy, or is he someone we need to learn to emulate?

Which Advanced Country Has the Most Climate Sceptics? Hint: It’s Not the United States By Graham Readfearn

It’s not necessarily a competition you should be particularly keen to win, but which country in the world has the most climate change “sceptics”? Most people would probably hazard a guess at the United States, what with its preponderance of climate science denialist think tanks, conservative television and radio hosts and politicians who think it’s all a hoax. But a new study …

Obama’s Pacific Trade Deal Trails Behind China’s Development Vision By Nile Bowie

Often touted as the centerpiece of the Obama administration’s re-engagement with Asia, a close vote in the US Senate has brought the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) a major step closer to becoming law. Facing significant opposition within his own party, the US president has secured fast-track negotiating authority, limiting Congress’s constitutional authority to regulate the contents of the trade accord. Though …

TISA Leaks Part Deux: More Evidence of Concerted Attack on Democracy – Deirdre Fulton

The Trade in Services Agreement “responds to major corporate lobbies’ desire to deregulate services,” says global trade expert. (Photo: GGAADD/flickr/cc) One day after it leaked a trove of documents related to the massive, pro-corporate Trade in Services Agreement (TISA), WikiLeaks on Thursday published another four chapters of the proposed 52-nation trade deal, covering key areas ahead of the next negotiating round on Monday. …

The Hidden Toxins In Your Clothing By Dr. Edward F. Group III

Popular clothing stores, like H&M, Levi’s, and Gap, are beginning to turn their attention toward producing healthier and more environmentally-friendly clothing. [1] Increased consumer awareness around the dangers of synthetic dyes, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and phthalates in conventional clothing is fueling a drastic revolution in the fashion industry. Keeping in line with current trends, clothing retailers are finally attempting to appeal to health-conscious buyers …

minimum wage

The “Fight for $15″ and the Return of the Vanishing Worker – Richard Eskow

On April 15, perhaps as you’re reading these words, working people in 200 American cities will rally for a $15 base wage and the right to form a union. Solidarity demonstrations are planned in more than 30 cities on six continents, and have already taken place in Switzerland, the Philippines, South Korea, New Zealand, and Japan. The “fight for $15” matters …

geopolitics

From Watersheds to Mountains, What If We Based Our Borders on Nature? – Rachael Stoeve

There’s little natural about the boundaries that divide states and countries. They’re often imaginary lines that result from history, conflict, or negotiation. But imagine what the world would look like if borders were set according to ecological and cultural boundaries. Bioregionalism says that’s the only logical way to divide up territory: Let watersheds, mountain ranges, microclimates, and the local knowledge …

bioregionalism

From Watersheds to Mountains, What If We Based Our Borders on Nature?

There’s little natural about the boundaries that divide states and countries. They’re often imaginary lines that result from history, conflict, or negotiation. But imagine what the world would look like if borders were set according to ecological and cultural boundaries. Bioregionalism says that’s the only logical way to divide up territory: Let watersheds, mountain ranges, microclimates, and the local knowledge …