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Julie Fidler – Study Finds Stress at Work is Just as Bad for Your Health as Second-Hand Smoke

Being stressed out at work is just as bad as regularly being exposed to second-hand smoke, a new study by researchers at Harvard Business School and Stanford University finds. Using data from 228 other studies that assessed the effects of 10 workplace stressors on employee physical and mental health, morbidity, and mortality, researchers concluded that workers who faced a great …

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The Dr. Peter Breggin Hour – 09.16.15

A master class in psychotherapy to help very disturbed and even violent people. Bertram Karon, PhD may be the most experienced clinician and researcher in the world concerning drug-free treatment of people labeled “schizophrenic” or rejected as incurably violent. He is also the most articulate. Bert provides very detailed real life stories and concludes with scientific research.

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New research confirms how to take better workday breaks

Most people take breaks during their workdays. Coffee breaks. Lunch breaks. Short chats with coworkers. Maybe late afternoon walks around the building. But are they taking the best type of breaks? Breaks that boost energy, concentration and motivation? Two Baylor University researchers have published a new empirical study – “Give Me a Better Break: Choosing Workday Break Activities to Maximize …

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Risk of financial crisis higher than previously estimated International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

The study, published in the journal Financial Stability, introduces a new method that allows researchers to estimate the systemic risk that emerge from multiple layers of connectivity. “Systemic risk is the risk that a significant part of the financial system stops working–that it cannot perform its function,” says IIASA Advanced Systems Analysis program researcher Sebastian Poledna, who led the study. …

water

Gaius Publius – One Way to Ease the Worldwide Water Crisis — End Privatization

Water is literally the stuff of life for living beings. All life began as single-celled organisms floating in water. In their earliest and simplest form, living things are organized bags of water capable of reproduction, whose “inside” water is held together by a permeable or semi-permeable membrane (“sack” or “skin”) through which nutrients borne by the “outside” water (the environment) …

Big Pharma Promises Men Endless Youth With Drug That May Cause Clots, Heart Problems, Suicide By Martha Rosenberg

Recently, an editorial in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society cited “disease-mongering” of testosterone to men for conditions for which it is not approved. Increasingly low libido, obesity and other age-related changes are attributed to “Low T” or low testosterone. This spring, I interviewed a coauthor of the editorial, Thomas Perls, a professor of medicine and director of the New England …

HOW ANTI-GAY PREJUDICE CUTS LIFE EXPECTANCY

In the first study to look at the consequences of anti-gay prejudice for mortality, researchers found that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals who lived in communities with high levels of anti-gay prejudice have a shorter life expectancy of 12 years on average compared with their peers in the least prejudiced communities. “The results of this study suggest a broadening …

The shame of psychology

Thomas Scheff would like psychologists to talk about emotion — not simply to share feelings, but to advance science. According to the emeritus professor of sociology at UC Santa Barbara, intuition could be the catalyst that enables psychology to progress in areas in which it has stagnated. His research, “Three Scandals in Psychology: The Need for a New Approach,” is …

Five companies control more than half of academic publishing BY RALPH TURCHIANO

A study at the University of Montreal shows that the market share of the five largest research publishing houses reached 50% in 2006, rising, thanks to mergers and acquisitions, from 30% in 1996 and only 20% in 1973. “Overall, the major publishers control more than half of the market of scientific papers both in the natural and medical sciences and …

New research suggests afterlife belief preserves hope when thinking about death

The prospect of death does not necessarily leave people feeling hopelessly mortal but depends rather on afterlife belief, suggests new research from psychologists at the University of Kent. Dr Arnaud Wisman and Dr Nathan Heflick, of the University’s School of Psychology, set out to establish in four separate studies whether people lose hope when thinking about death – known as …